How to set up SuperSu root manager after root

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How to set up SuperSu root manager after root

If you have SuperSu on your device you must be familiar with rooting. So what is SuperSu application and what can you do with it? In general it is the tool which manages root permissions for all the applications on the phone which require root, with SuperSu you can select which apps have root access and which do not.

Lets have a look inside SuperSu, inside you have 3 sections: Apps, Logs and Settings.

The 1st section (APPS) shows you list of  applications installed on the device which asked for root access.

Click on app to open menu: next to option ACCESS you can select PROMPT, GRANT or DENY, depending if you want application to gain root privileges. Try to keep list of apps with granted permissions as short as you can, allow permissions only for the apps which either work with root only or have more privileges with it.

Next option is NOTIFICATIONS, you can choose options: “Global Default” to see  notifications if app is gaining access on the screen or “Disabled”, to switch off annoying dialog for specific app.

The 2nd section (LOGS) Shows you which app asked for root permission, time and which action was taken (allowed or denied) in case you switched on Logging option in settings. Pretty simple. Let’s move further!

The 3nd section (SETTINGS) Settings is the largest one and the most important – Settings. Correct set up is of great importance to avoid problems.

Enable SuperSu – switches on/off root on the phone, should have checkmark for root t work;

Re-authentication – disabled in case you do not want SuperSu to ask permissions again in case app is reinstalled or upgraded. If option was enabled SuperSu will always ask again permissions for the app after upgrade/reinstallation. I keep it disabled to avoid annoying dialogue pop-up.

Default access – selects default root access for all apps in case no option was chosen when prompt appears. You can choose GRANT / PROMPT/DENY.

Auto deny countdown (available for PRO version only) – gives you option to set up countdown time on SuperSu prompt asking to grant or deny access, basically that is how long user will see prompt on the screen to decide the destiny of app, in case no option selected – default value is chosen. Keep in mind that setting the countdown more than 10 seconds may cause crashes for apps which are written not in perfect way. As for me it is a bit useless:)

Show notifications – you have two options to select: “Global Default”  – if you wish to see notifications in notification menu bar about gaining access, “Disabled” – in case notifications are annoying for you and you want to get rid of them. I always select second one.

Logging – if you are not a developer, do not plan to be developer and do not need to get debug logs from SuperSu or even do not know what it is  – select option NONE, otherwise if debugging is important choose GLOBAL DEFAULT. Keep in mind it may cause crash of the application in case root permissions are asked great deal of times and logs are saved, stored, fill up memory of the phone.

Clear logs after – time-frame during which SuperSu logs are saved in case Logging is enabled. Otherwise option is grayed out.

Logs date format – choose format of date displayed.

 The Auto-refresh apps and logs tab allows the phone automatically refresh apps and logs tabs as new entries are added. Detection depends on access and notification settings.

PIN code (Pro version only) – gives option to protect SuperSu with PIN, may be useful in case Multiusers option was enabled and different users use device.

Enable Su during boot – applies all permissions during boot in case option enabled. Otherwise, permissions are applied randomly after the boot. Better to keep option enabled for boot settings to be set up properly. This option is disabled by default – make sure you switch it on.

Launcher icon – gives you variety of SuperSu  logo options, also you can select INVISIBLE to hide icon.

Theme – select dark or light theme of SuperSu interface

Language – gives option to select convenient language from the list of available.

Install SuperSu into /system – option to make SuperSu system app, in this case you will not be able to remove it from regular application manager. To delete SuperSu you will need to use either Alternative App manager (Titanium backup), or use ADB, one more option – factory reset of the phone.

Trust system user – option to give root access to the apps that are located in /system/app (System applications).

Reinstall – designed to fix SuperSu crashes (SuperSu has stopped), click on it to clean up previous installation, then install from PlayStore. Not advised to use this option if no SuperSu issues occur.

Switch Superuser app – designed to change root manager, will clean up SuperSu. As for me SuperSu is the best app to manage root access, however if you prefer another one or just want to experiment – can try, that is your choice. Note that root can be lost during process and you will need to start all over again.

Full unroot – important option but tricky. Allows you completely remove root from device. Be careful with it – it can softbrick phone, I am seriously. Before clicking this button very important to switch off option Enable SuperSu, on the top of settings. Once done you can unroot, but not before unless you wish to flash stock firmware.

Pretty wide variety of options. Cannot really skip mentioning what to do if you selected option for SuperSu icon to be invisible.

In case the icon was hidden and you need to launch SuperSu there are a few options:

1) Dial one of codes on the dial pad, one of them may work:*#1234#* or *#*#1234#*#* or *#7873778#* or *#*#7873778#*#* (does not work on Android 6.0)

2) Download Enable_SuperSU.apk  (google it) and manually install on the phone. Once you launch it app will ask root access > hit GRANT. You will see pop-up with options to Enable Su and Make it visible (100% working).

3) Open PlayStore – find SuperSu and follow steps: Uninstall > Install > Open (sometimes may cause issue with updating binaries).

4) Use adb terminal (phone and adb drivers should be installed on PC) and type adb shell am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -n eu.chainfire.supersu/.MainActivity (100% working)

You can also use Terminal emulator (available on PlayStore) and type there am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -n eu.chainfire.supersu/.MainActivity

No need to type “adb shell” as you are already in shell 🙂

 

What if you rooted phone with the other application and now have KingUser or SuperUser but SuperSu is in your dreams and you cannot sleep even because of that.

There are several options how you can change root manager app. Keep in mind is not safe.

There are 2 options:

1) Download SuperSume application from PlayStore it costs 4$ approximately. Install it on the phone and launch > you will  get prompt asking root access > hit ALLOW. Then click on large blue button with Android guy and wait, process takes up to 5 minutes. In case nothing happens in 5 minutes – reboot phone and try again.

Phone may be rebooted automatically during process, do not panic. In case you see SuperSu after reboot  – means operation was succeed.

Open SuperSu – application will ask to update binaries – hit Continue and select Normal installation. Updating binaries may take up to 5 minutes, in case it is taking longer – reboot and try again.

In case update was successful – will get notification about that – restart the phone and use SuperSu, you are done and awesome.

In case you get error during binaries update – reboot and try again. Make sure KingUser/Kingroot was removed from the phone, if no – disable it from Application manager and try updating binaries again.

In case Kingroot/SuperUser was removed but SuperSu was not installed – try installing the one from PlayStore.

Keep in mind this method can cause bootloop and is not very safe, in case you do not want such thing to happen to your phone and have headache restoring it  think carefully why do you want to change root manager, what is purpose. Strongly NOT recommended for Alcatel, Huawei, ZTE and other Chinese phones.

2) Use adb or Terminal emulator and script to change icon. This method is more safe, but more difficult.

Firstly download mrw folder, place it in the internal storage of the phone.

Then  download ADB and drivers on the PC, connect phone and make sure it is recognized with adb. Then type: adb shell

In case you do not want to use PC/do not have it try Terminal Emulator from PlayStore on the phone> open it and ALLOW root access.

Now type following in the command line (both, PC or phone):

su

Hit enter, you will get prompt to allow root permissions, hit ALLOW.

The command line will move to next line and you will see # sign.

Now type:

sh /sdcard/mrw/root.sh

hit Enter, you will see code is running, some errors may appear but do not pay attention, SuperSu will be automatically launched in case of Success, application will ask to update binaries – hit Continue and select Normal installation. Updating binaries may take up to 5 minutes, in case it is taking longer – reboot and try again.  Make sure KingUser/Kingroot was removed from the phone, if no – disable it from Application manager and try updating binaries again.

In case update was successful you will get notification about that – restart the phone and use SuperSu. You are done and awesome.

In case SuperSu was not launched after script – check manually if you have it on the phone. If nothing appears – guess what? You are right – reboot and try again from the very beginning.

Note, script will not work in case mrv folder is located in the other location, different from specified /sdcard/mrw/root.sh

-Diana Lisovenko

Anti-Hacking Tools for Android – 2017 Guide

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Anti-Hacking Tools for Android – 2017 Guide

 

Android officially has the largest market share in the smartphone world and there is almost 1.5 billion people who use Android smartphone or tablet. This speaks volumes of the quality and affordability that Android offers to their users, but there are also problems and liabilities that always come with using widely popular brands.

Security is frequently one of the questions that come with using Android and this topic is always a matter of interest, especially if you’re using your Android devices for your work and some form of confidential data manipulation. We’ve decided to talk about anti-hacking tools that can make the breach of your security much more difficult for cybercriminals. In 2017, you can expect that there will be lots of new viruses and malware to look out for, so here are some tools to help you along the way.

AppLock

We all love using apps and while they’re incredibly useful, they can also serve as the back door through which hackers can slither through unnoticed. Too many people are still not careful enough about what they’re installing on their devices and whether those apps come from trusted sources and therein lies the problem. To put a stopper on having this problem (even potentially) is to secure your phone with an app that is specifically designed to lock all other apps. While your lock screen only protects you from the outside attacks, it doesn’t do much more for anything going on inside your phone and this is where AppLock takes center stage.

Once you’ve downloaded it, you are free to lock any app you feel should be protected – anything from Facebook to your email and bank accounts. By using this app, you’re making sure that no one but you will be able to touch your private information plus you will limit the access that apps have in your device, so you’re killing two birds with one stone.

Use High Quality Password Manager

Seeing that practically everything on the internet has to be protected by a password, you need to do your best to keep this aspect of your security in check. This isn’t necessarily easy, because you need strong passwords for every account you have, and that means complex words usually concocted with numbers and special characters. If this sounds like a lot of work, well, it is, but thankfully, you don’t have to keep it all in your head. There are some very good password managers like Zoho, LastPass and RoboForm that will do an excellent job in managing passwords for your numerous accounts. Not only that, but a password manager worth its salt will suggest how to make your passwords more secure and give you additional tips on how to protect your privacy even more. You are also able to keep in check any personal information you have and protect your usernames as well.

Encrypt Everything with a VPN

Privacy when you’re using your Android device is equally important as when you’re using your desktop computer or laptop, though we often forget this. Smartphones are quite vulnerable to security breaches and one of the best ways to prevent that from happening is to encrypt both the data on your phone and your internet connection. Whenever you’re connected to a public network, you’re in danger of catching a virus or having a hacker on your tail, and virtual private networks simply erase this problem. Good VPN providers like Nord VPN can provide you with military level encryption for your Android device, so that hackers can’t harm your privacy in any way. Talking about anti-hacking tools, when you want to encrypt some very important files on your device, there are great encryption apps that you can use and that are also free, so that you don’t have to spend a lot of money on your Android security.

Use Security Software You Know Is Good

Long gone are the times when you could just pick any antivirus and be set when it comes to security. Android devices need to be protected with strong antivirus software because while it’s the most versatile platform, it is also most prone to small, pesky security issues like spyware and viruses. Depending on what kind of an internet user you are and how much sensitive information you’re managing on your device, you need to find antivirus that suits your needs. Sure, there are some great free version like Avira, Avast and Panda, but if you need stronger security that includes anti-spam, antimalware and functioning firewall, then you will have to pay to get all-encompassing protection. You may not pay it gladly, but online security is scarce these days, and paying a couple of bucks a month is more than acceptable for the peace of mind you’re getting in return.

Get Email Encryption Software

Email scams are still very much a thing, even though many of us believe that we wouldn’t fall for that. While you’ve got your security software to protect you against spamming and phishing, it would be wise to encrypt your emails in general. A lot of sensitive details are conveyed via email and chances are you don’t want your mail to get into wrong hands. If hackers get into your email, they can take advantage of your address book and spam all your friends and colleagues, which never ends well. Software like Data Motion and HP Secure Wall have proven their worth over time, which is why it’s worth given them a shot.

Anti-hacking tools for Android abound these days and all you have to do is take your pick. Of course, it’s very important for you to be wary as well and know what not to do when browsing the internet because no anti-hacking tool will help you unless you always remain security aware. What apps and security software do you use? Please comment and share your opinion. – Thomas Milva

 

Thomas Milva is 28, he lives in Baton Rouge and is a dedicated Analyst of Information Security, which is why he moved to Baton Rouge, where he lives now and he loves it.  He’s got Italian ancestry and is very fond of his pets, Reggie the dog and his two goldfish. Thomas mostly works from home, which is why he’s contemplating of adopting another dog.