The Pixel 3 Leaks Just Keep Coming!

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The Pixel 3 Leaks Just Keep Coming!

 

If you’re a phone junky then you’ve probably been following all the buzz surrounding the upcoming Pixel 3.  And if you haven’t been but are interested in catching up, then you’ve come to the right place.  Rumors and leaks galore have been floating around this week and late discussing what the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL have in store for users.  Let’s discuss:

It’s Huge:

I’m not just talking about the hype.  The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL are going to be larger than their predecessors (is anyone surprised?).  Measuring in at 5.3’’ and 6.2’’ respectively these phones will be giving the iPhone X a run for its money in terms of screen real estate.  And also much like the iPhone…yep you guess it, there’s a notch thrown into the mix.

Just like almost every other android phone since the iPhone X’s reveal the notch seems to be playing a big role in design practices.  A few images were images have been posted on the XDADeveloper’s forum showing a Pixel 3 rocking a notched display, dual front cameras, and a back that appears to be made of glass.

New features:

Why glass on the back?  Well this has led to speculation that wireless charging may be coming back into play.  This feature was discontinued a few years back in the Nexus series after Google’s acquisition of HTC.  The argument was…not the strongest.  Google argued that Nexus phones had too much z (thickness) with the wireless charging, and that USB Type-C charging was a much simpler solution.  Maybe more efficient, but its definitely not as cool!

Of course we have to take these leaks with a grain of salt.  The Pixel’s camera is a good demonstration of this.  There’s been a lot of back and forth about whether one or two cameras are in store for the new device.  Leaked images have confirmed both cases, so its hard to know what’s really true and what is just a wannabe, but a series of images leaked by 9to5Google show a single rear camera on a Pixel 3 prototype.  This leak matters as the phone was sporting a mystery Google logo, so it gains another ounce of credibility.

Whatever the case, Pixel’s are known for their phenomenal cameras, and when the Pixel 2 came out its camera blew us away.  Since then quite a few other phones have scored higher on DxOMark (a image quality rating site), but at the time the Pixel 2 was the leader.  So odds are the Pixel 3 is going to exceed expectations again and top the charts in this manner.

New Software:

The Pixel 3 is also expected to be the first official phone rocking Android P software.  So new features like RTT-Wi-Fi and auto-adjusting batteries will open new possibilities for both users and developers.  Android P is currently available for beta use if you’re interested in exploring it early, but if you’re planning on purchasing a Pixel 3, you’ll have it in your hands before you know it.  There’s no official release date set right now, but the popular opinion is this October.  So close and yet so far.

What are you hoping the Pixel 3 will have that other phones are lacking?  Do you think it will be a let down or a leader in the industry?  Let us know in the comments below!

Android One.  Two Different Strategies

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Android One.  Two Different Strategies

Rumors have been spreading about the new Motorola One Power.  This week we got a glance at what’s coming to the market, and you may not be surprised to see that a notch is involved in the desgin.  A lot of Android phones this year have been mimicking the iPhone X’s newest feature, but there’s a lot more to the One Power than just how it looks.  It’s the head of a movement.

The One Power is sure to be a quality phone for its users.  At least a lot depends on it being that way since it will be the newest phone to carry on the Google One movement.  That movement began in 2014 as an attempt to capture the “next billion Android users” in developing countries.  It aimed to provide smartphones with current software at sub-100 dollar prices.

But How?

Typically this was possible by severly limiting specs like storage and RAM.  Users don’t have to spend much, but they can still experience all the cool new features versions like Android P have to offer.  Meanwhile Google gains a hold on smartphone marketspace that might otherwise not be filled due to price restrictions.  It’s a win win.  

At least that was the plan back then.  4 years later and the Android One movement didn’t take off exactly as the marketing team planned.  Sales faltered for the lower end phones due to their lack of being positively distinguished from their more expensive counterparts.  Appearing somewhat clunky, budget phones didn’t sell well, and there’s still a large population out there that is waiting to be capitalized on.  Android Go rose to take Android One’s place as the budget movement recently, and it looks like this new burst of marketing may have a better outlook.

Down But Not Out

That being said, Android One didn’t fade into oblivion, but instead decided to change its strategy.  It’s risen its price range to the $250-400 mark and in turn is producing sleeker more “high-end” looking phones that run on the newest softwares.  These phones are still more affordable than some, and this is thanks to the movement’s slogan “Everything you want.  Nothing you don’t.”  The phones don’t have a bunch of manufacturer customizations, but instead function similarly to Nexus and Pixel phones today.  They have Google’s apps built in, and run the latest Google software, but that’s just about it.  This is great if you’re not looking to spend a fortune and you also don’t feel the need for the extra add ons.

The One Power Up Close

The Motorola Power One will be prominently displaying a notch on its front along with a vertical dual carmera placement on its back.  Couple this with curved edges and a fingerprint sensor and we’re looking at a pretty stylish phone.  Whether you like the iPhone X or not, its undeniable that it’s style has set a trend that others a following.  How the software on the inside runs is a whole nother store though!

Do you have any thoughts on the new Motorola Power One?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

Making Material Design Work For You

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Making Material Design Work For You

So you’ve built an app.  You’ve come up with a million dollar idea and you’re ready to build it and market it to the masses.  The concept is there and you know enough to develop it.  But does it look…good?

There’s a lot more to that one simple question than we initially see.  No matter what your app has to offer the world, people aren’t going to keep coming back to it unless it has a well designed interface.  This means that things should be both pleasing on the eyes and easy to use.  Users should find themselves knowing exactly where to look when they want something to happen.

So how can we design such an app?  There’s full courses for this one concept that you could enroll in, but here are some key highlights to making your app pop:

ConstraintLayout:

If you’ve taken intro to Android programming courses before then chances are you’ve done a little design with LinearLayout and RelativeLayout.  These are simple ViewGroups that you can use to organize the images and text on a user’s screen.  While these are useful at times, if used improperly they can start to bog down your app (learn why here!).

ConstraintLayout offers a more efficient way to group your apps exactly how you want them on your screen.  You can group your images in relation to one another on the screen or choose to position them a percentage away from your edges.  Really if you can think of a way you want to organize things, chances are there’s a way to do it with ConstraintLayout.  And without hurting your performance too!

Surfaces:

A simple way to think about the surfaces in your app is in terms of pieces of paper being stacked upon one another.  You can have views side by side or on top of one another, but however you organize things you want the user to know what’s important and what’s just extra.  Changing the elevation of your surfaces can bring what your want to the forefront and control where the user is looking.  It’s sneaky, but it makes a world of difference. 

By raising the elevation of a view a bit it begins to cast a shadow onto the views below it.  This way the end user gains a 3D perspective of what objects are closer to them and thus deserve attention.  Things like Floating Action Buttons (FABs) have this built into them already.  Use them wisely thought, as overcrowding your screen with elevated views can make it just look crowded and sloppy.

Custom fonts:

Style runs deep.  Deeper than just picking a font that you think looks neat.  Fonts with a very static and bold tone can give off the impression that your app is serious.  This can be great if you’re making something like a banking app that wants users to take it seriously and see it as secure.  But if you use one of those fonts with an art app it will be very unrelatable.  Likewise if you have a security based app that has fancy cursive writing users will naturally assume that the creators cares more about looks than performance and may lose faith in it.  Obviously I can’t pick for you, but I can tell you the decision matters!

Transitions With Motion:

As I said earlier your user should know what to do without even thinking about it.  This is where transitions and motion can come in handy.  Take for example a list of songs that a user can scroll through.  Well, if your user doesn’t know much about the app and their screen just so happens to load evenly (aka there are no songs cut off at the bottom), they might think they’re already looking at the whole list.  This would be tragic as they wouldn’t know to scroll down and might assume you just don’t have many songs available.

To fix this you could design your app so that when the list appears it slides in from the bottom of the screen.  This way the user sees it scroll a little upon launch, and their pattern recognizing brain will naturally assume it can keep scrolling.  It’s small, but given the right situation the impact can be huge.

What do you look for in an app when you download it?  Or more importantly what have apps lacked in that made you think twice about keeping them?  Let us know in the comments below!

Changing Your Software In A Flash

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Changing Your Software In A Flash

Android P is the hot new software that just hit the market, and as such those ahead of the pack will be scrambling to get it on their phones.  This doesn’t mean that they have to go out and buy a phone with the newest software on it though.  By flashing your current phone you’re able to gain access to either the newest features on the market.  Or if you’re feeling nostalgic you can flash your phone to older versions as well.

The term “flashing” may be a new one to you, but if so don’t worry.  All it essentially means is that you’re loading a different version of software onto your operating system.  (Although you probably figured that out from the first paragraph).  So flashing forward can get you fancy new features, but why would you go backwards?  One reason might be to conserve battery power.  A newer version is bound to drain your battery faster, so the trade off may be worth it. 

WARNING:

Now here’s where I throw out the very important disclaimer.  Flashing your phone will erase all data from the device, and doing things wrong may brick your device. This means that if things are done incorrectly or get interrupted then you may render you phone unusable.  This is why its highly recommended to only flash a phone when its full charged.  If somehow the phone died mid process things could get tricky quickly.

That being said flashing can offer some really cool features, so if you’re careful and follow a guide to do it properly the results are worth it.  So how do you do it? There are a few things that you’ll need to make sure you have on your computer before starting the process, but overall the steps are simple.  In all flashing shouldn’t take you more than 30 minutes (and that’s moving slowly following a guide).  Google offers a step by step instructional guide on its docs page, but in order to follow this you’ll have to have the following tools:

-Android Debug Bride (ADB) and Fastboot

-A phone set to developer mode

-The correct image for the version you’re flashing to

Flashing can be a really cool experiment to undertake if you’ve never done it before and want to change how your phone works.  Just make sure you proceed with caution and charge your phone in advance.  If you really want to know more about it and get support on flashing/rooting your device Phonlab offers a course that covers just about every phone you can imagine!

Keeping Your Keys Safe

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Keeping Your Keys Safe

At some point in your app development career, you’ll create an app that has secrets.  By this I mean there will be keys inside that you want to keep secure from prying eyes.  If someone else gets a hold of your private info, the results could be disastrous (or expensive).

Let’s say your app uses Amazon Web Services and your monthly bill runs about $350 a month. That’s fine because you’re making the money back through app usage.  That is, until a 3rd party gets a hold of your secret key and decides to use it for their own purposes.  Then when your next bill comes due you find that you’re being charged for $50,000.

Not an exaggeration.  This exact scenario actually happened.  So the lesson is painful but memorable: secrets should be kept secret!  Let’s use this blog to talk about a couple ways people tend to store their keys and what you should avoid.

Avoid pushing keys to github:

I’ll start with what may sound obvious.  That sight that you put all of your code onto so that people can publicly view it?  Yeah, don’t put your secret keys up there.  This sounds obvious, but recent studies have shown thousands upon thousands of keys are available on public git repositories.  It’s possible your using a free service and don’t care, but if you’re being charge even a dollar for the service you’re using, keep it close to your heart.

Storing keys as basic Strings:

DON’T DO THIS!  Storing a key as a simple string is just asking for trouble.  There a couple issues behind this, but first and foremost is that it’s incredibly easy to access.  If you read our primer on reverse engineering apps then you know that it’s possible for 3rd parties to decompile your app and look at its code in its (almost) original form.  Storing a key as a string means the hacker just has to glance over your code and look for something that looks like a key.  Then it’s theirs and they can do what they want until you change it. 

Defining keys in build.gradle:

This is better than storing your keys as Strings in any old file, but the end result is unfortunately similar.  A lot of people put their keys in build.gradle in such a way that it’s created in the BuildConfig file of your app.  The bright side is your gradle file isn’t decompiled along with the rest of your app, so secrets are safe in there.  The downside?  Well, that BuildConfig class they were just created in isn’t as secure.  Again, our Strings are exposed in a very simple to access way.

Securing keys with Android NDK:

Let me take a second here to say something important: There is no such thing as absolute security.  If you’re going to have a secret in your app, all you can truly do is make it incredibly difficult to find.  Take the proper precautions to keep things safe, and a hacker will have to decide if it’s worth the time/energy to get to whatever is hidden.

With that said, the Android NDK (Native Development Kit) can help us use C and C++ code with Android.  Why would we want to do this?  Well for starters NDK libraries can’t be decompiled, so the information inside is a lot harder to find.  There are ways to access this code all the same, but we won’t go into them here.  It’s not perfect, but this will throw quite a few entry level hackers off your tail.

Make your code complicated:

This one again goes to what I said earlier about complete security.  It won’t happen, but you can make a hacker’s life hell by making your keys as hard to read as possible.  Let’s take a very basic example:  If your key was 123456, instead of storing that, you could make it the sum of the strings “12”, “34”, and “56”.  How you can break this up depends on how creative you can get, but there really isn’t a limit.  It just means more work for you both upfront and down the road to ensure you understand everything your code is doing.

Keeping keys safe is crucial for a large apps success, so you need to take precautions to avoid disaster.  If you have any suggestions for great ways to hide Strings inside your app let us know in the comments below!

Google I/O, Until Next Year

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Google I/O, Until Next Year

Well Google I/O is a wrap everyone, and if you tuned in then hopefully you left with some cool takeaways.  If not then don’t worry, that’s what we’re here for.  When the conference first kicked off we wrote about day 1 and its highlights, but obviously the fun didn’t stop there.  The following is a crash course selection of (in my opinion) the most important and amazing takeaways for and android junky.

Flutter:

If you’re an android developer, then your undoubtedly familiar with Java and segueing in to Kotlin.  You might not have heard about Flutter before though.  It’s Google’s mobile app SDK for easily creating high quality apps on both Android and iOS devices.  Written in Dart (a language developed by Google as well), Flutter works with existing code and is used to develop at ridiculously high speeds.  Here’s a great video from Google I/O that goes more in depth on how to use Flutter to enhance your material design.

Duplex:

Now this one blows my mind, and I know I’m not alone here.  When you think of a sci-fi future it’s reasonable if computers playing our personal secretaries pops into your mind.  This seems to be the present now. 

I’m very interested to see how Duplex functions successfully in real world applications, but the Google 2018 keynote showed a quick performance of the Google Assistant booking a haircut appointment for Google’s CEO, Sundar Pichai.  From an outsider’s view the conversation was impossible to distinguish from an everyday conversation between two people, and when it was done the Google Assistant confirmed to Sundar that the appointment had been booked and added to his calendar.  It’s only a matter of time before this is both client and server side so that duplex will be having conversations with itself to schedule our days, and that’s pretty wild.

Android P Beta:

Yes, I know we discussed android P in the last blog on Google I/O.  But you’ll have to bear with me because it’s happening again! As of this week the Android P beta is available on Pixel devices as well as 7 other flagship devices.  Android P brings all kinds of cool new features to the table.  A lot of these revolve around predicting what you the user are about to do.  There’s an adaptive battery that adjusts your screen’s brightness and what apps are running in an effort to both improve your experience and conserve precious battery power.

My personal favorite feature of P is Wi-Fi RTT.  Round Trip Time takes our current location services capabilities and amplifies them.  Essentially by triangulating between multiple Wi-fi access points nearby, a user’s position can be calculated within about a meter.  Just use your imagination for what applications this could come in handy for!  For more on Android P you can read our past posts or watch some Google I/O talks.

There’s lots more to take away from Google I/O, and honestly I’m cutting myself off here because otherwise I’d end up writing a paragraph or two about every session that I watched from the entire conference.  It’s a great year to be an android developer or even just own an android device.

What interested you the most from the conference?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

Google I/O Is In!

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Google I/O Is In!

We’ve talked about Google I/O being on the horizon here before, but we can do that no longer.  It’s here! (Actually once it’s over we’ll probably immediately start writing about 2019’s event).

Yes, today marks the kickoff of Google’s 11th annual conference.  And as such the entire Android population has a lot of stuff to talk about.  Google I/O started off strong with its keynote mapping out some of the things to be discussed this year.  Here are some of the highlights of day one:

Artificial Intelligence:

As with most other places these days, AI was one of the most used buzzwords at day one.  It’s somewhat become an all encompassing term for any technological advancement that helps us.  Despite this, Google separates itself from the pack by bringing some pretty cool new features to the table.  Whether it’s self-writing emails or auto adjusting screen brightness to your preference, Google is working on slipping AI into every part of our days.

Actually it’s so much cooler than that.  In the video above at 3:10 you can watch the Google Assistant play as your personal secretary.  It makes a call to a local hair salon and books an appointment without the person on the other end ever realizing they’re talking to AI.  Scary cool.

Android P:

There’s been lots of hype about Android P in the past few months, and we got to see more today.  With it’s 3 key themes of Intelligence, Simplicity, and Digital wellbeing, Android P seeks to one up everything else already in your hand and provide a predictive, pleasant experience.  We’ve talked before about some of the new features coming with Android P, and today that list only gets longer.

Adaptive Battery is a feature aimed to conserving battery life by using (you guessed it) AI.  It studies your app usage patterns and then can dedicate more battery power to conserving the things that you will likely be using in the near future.  Along with this comes the Adaptive Brightness feature I mentioned above where your screen will auto-adjust given your preferences.

Not only does P look to alleviate your battery strain under the hood, but it uses its predictive analytics to bring apps you’re about to use to the forefront.  P is currently available on a select few devices (9 total), and if you’re interested in downloading it click here.  If you’re unsure what you’re doing and want support with flashing your phone, then check out our Smartphone Tech Course over at Phonlab.  Otherwise stay tuned and we’ll post a guide in the near future.

Augmented Reality:

As for the other big buzzword topic, Augmented Reality had some cool new features to display.  Maps have been souped up with the newest computer vision features to recognize where you’re looking in the real world and flash both directional arrows for guidance as well as information about local places.  If you’re walking down the street and a restaurant catches your eye, say goodbye to opening up yelp and searching for its reviews.

The camera has also become greatly enhanced with its new capability to recognize where things are in the real world in terms of depth perceptions.  Moving your phone around your room, office, or down the street you’re able to get live estimates of how far away things are.  This is sure to be crucial in a lot of coming apps.

There’s a lot more to come in this year’s Google I/O, and we’ll keep you updated here.  Is there anything in particular you want us to go more in depth on?  Comment below and we’ll give you all the info you could dream of!

 

 

 

 

Reverse Engineering Apps. A Primer

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Reverse Engineering Apps.  A Primer

Reverse engineering is a pretty cool concept.  Someone builds something, you want to see how they did it, so you take it apart and see how it was put together in the first place.   It can be a great way to learn, and it pushes technological progress forward.  But there’s also a dangerous side to it.

Reverse engineering done with malicious intent can lead to copyright infringement or other damages.  It’s a fine line to walk on for what is ethical and what isn’t, and that doesn’t change inside of the Android world.  In here reverse engineering is common and developers should always account for it when building apps to make sure they’re taking necessary precautions.

The term for reverse engineering an app is “decompiling”, and what you’re decompiling is an APK (Android Package Kit).   This is essentially just a .zip file that stores our apps code.  You build an APK when you compile your code and use that APK to upload the app onto the Google Play Store.  This is then what users around the world download onto their devices.  And if they’re tech-savvy enough, they can open up this APK and see what’s inside.

Why Decompile?

Let’s take a second to think about a couple reasons why we would want to decompile our APKs.  One possibility is that we’ve misplaced our source code and are hoping to recover it.  If this was the case then we could decompile our app from a phone it was already on. Note that this has its limitations as the decompiled code will not be the exact same as the original.  Some parts will be lost along the way, so make sure you save your code on Github!

Another possible reason for decompiling an app would be to evaluate its security.  If you’re able to see things you want to keep private simply by decompiling an app, other people can too.  And chances are they won’t always be decompiling for education purposes.  I’ll be following up on this blog shortly with another one going more in depth on how to properly hide secrets in your apps.

And of course there’s always decompiling for modding purposes. If you reverse engineer an app and put it back together how you want then you can add new features or customize how things behave.  Here’s where I throw in a disclaimer that you should make sure you’re a law abiding citizen while doing these things.  Lots of companies/developers would be very unhappy to hear that someone is decompiling their apps to make monetary gains.

How To Decompile?

The good news is that if you want to decompile apps on your own, you absolutely can!  You’ll need to download a popular tool known as apktool, and also make sure you have java set up on your computer.    Here’s an great video showing how to use apktool to theme and edit android apps.

 

Want to know more about decompiling apps?  Don’t worry we’ll be writing lots more on it soon, but in the mean time let us know what you want to know in the comments below!

Android’s Developer Website Just Got A BIG Makeover

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Android’s Developer Website Just Got A BIG Makeover

If you’ve ever thought about developing for Android then chances are you’ve at least stumbled upon developer.android.com.  And chances are you left with a bitter taste in your mouth.  Fear not, things are looking up.

I remember my first time looking at Android’s developer docs.  I was a novice developer and as such the website was chock-full of useful information, but it seemed borderline impossible to navigate.  Countless topics linked into one another describing the different components of an app.  Couple this with all the attributes listed for each subject, and your brain quickly starts to spin.

What’s New?

I’ve discussed this navigation difficulty with others before, and that’s why I was so happy to hear the website just got a makeover.  First off, it looks much better.  Whitespace is used to give the new layout a sleeker more aesthetic look while the landing page emphasizes a preview for Android P.  Scrolling down from there the home page is neatly divided.  Sections for featured topics, material design, and where to begin your development journey pave the path.

But, of course, there’s much much more to this website than how it looks.  The most important thing is that someone who finds themselves here actually learns about what they’re looking for.  The new website does a much better job of guiding users who are in uncharted territory.  Selecting “Docs” in the top banner takes users to this page.

In here the core developer topics that every android programmer NEEDS to know about are listed.  Clicking on each of these links will take the user to a simple explanation accompanied with an intro video.  Then immediately below these are trees of related/more in-depth topics.  The result is an easy cursory explanation of each topic and then more complicated explanations for those that want to learn more.

Material Design and More

The website has tons of sections and features, but one other one I’d like to highlight is the “Design & Quality” tab.  It’s important to remember that there’s more to developing that just creating sound logic.  Users of your apps also have come to expect high quality layouts and design patterns.  This section of the website helps explain to developers how to wow users with apps that know what they want before even they do.

In summary, the old developer website was certainly useful, you just needed to know what you were looking for.  The new model offers a much easier guide for new entrants. It takes them by the hand and shows them both what topics are easy to comprehend and what fundamentals should be learned first.  Overall I think the new website is a vast improvement to its somewhat clunky counterpart, and I look forward to using it as my development journey continues.

Have you check out the new site and feel that it’s still missing anything?  Let us know in the comments below!

Android Security Is Still Secure. Seriously.

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Android Security Is Still Secure. Seriously.

There’s been a lot of media hype this past month about Android phones and their lack of security.  Headlines such as “How Android Phones Hide Missed Security Updates From You” have been floating around causing mass panic.

Take a deep breath.  It’s ok.

Despite the plethora of recent articles claiming that Android phones are under attack and that you’re a victim, chances are you’re actually safer than you think.  Yes there was a study earlier this month that found some phones were behind on their security updates.  But that doesn’t mean that all of your data is exposed to whoever wants to take it.  Even with a few security updates missing, you should be alright.  Let’s take a second to discuss some of the other security features that Android architecture has in place to protect you:

Google Play Protect

Google Play Protect is a safeguard to protect Android users from malicious apps.  Even with Google’s screening process to let apps onto the Play Store, chances are some baddies will slip through the cracks and are available for download.  Google Play Protect attempts to stop these apps in their tracks by doing routine scans on your phone for every app even after it’s been installed.  If there’s a cause for concern detected, you’ll be notified. 

This software also applies to apps updates, so the short version of it is that apps can’t just slide by once. As long as you have Play Protect enabled on your phone, apps are continuously exposed to it.  Chances are your phone already has Play Protect, but if you want to be sure (or just see what it’s been up to) you can find it in the Play Store.  Open the store and then tap the 3 horizontal bars menu icon.  Then select “Play Protect” and you’ll be taken to a page showing what apps have been scanned recently and how your device looks.

Sandboxing

Android apps are naturally sandboxed from one another.  What this means is that each apps data and code execution is isolated from others.  So if you happen to download the wrong app it doesn’t mean it will automatically have access to all of the apps already on your phone.  We go into depth about the android security framework in our Android development course over at Phonlab.  Content Providers offer a storage mechanism for apps so that their information has to be requested before it can become accessible to just anyone.

Android Permissions work along with this to make sure that no matter what if you have some common sense you should be safe.  Permissions essentially are requirements that if an app utilizes a certain feature (such as syncing with your contacts) it has to be granted permission by the user.

These permissions are presented to a user when the app attempts to access them, and are only allowed when the user says so.  You retain complete control over what access an app has.  Imagine you downloaded a game and it started asking you for access to your contacts and your saved media files.  Red flags should be going up right away since a game has no reason to use these.  As long as you don’t blindly hit accept to every permission, you retain a ton of control over what an app can actually do.

What are your thoughts on Android’s security measures?  Let us know in the comments below!