Android Q Swipes Into Beta 6

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Android Q Swipes Into Beta 6

Android Q has been out since March steadily progressing through its betas.  This week Q hit its last step in the refinement process with the release of the final beta 6.  The official release is “a few weeks away” at this point, but if you’re interested in exploring Q early there’s no better time than the present!

Changes With 6:

Spoiler Alert: there aren’t that many changes in the new version.   Final APIs for developers were locked down in beta 4, so 5 and this new version are mostly bug fixes and small tweaks.   But one big change is with gesture navigation.  The back gesture has received a bit of a makeover.  Here’s what Google had to say about it:

“We’ve made further refinements to Gesture Navigation in Beta 6 based on user feedback. First, to ensure reliable and consistent operation, there’s a 200dp vertical app exclusion limit for the Back gesture. Second, we’ve added a sensitivity preference setting for the Back gesture.”

To non-developers the 200dp may not make sense, but the concept is fairly simple.  Apps have the option to opt out of the back button gesture navigation, but only to an extent.  They’re only allowed to stop the back gesture for 200 “density-independent pixels”.  The idea behind this is to make things easier if you’re in an app that involves horizontal scrolling.  We don’t want a user to accidentally go back when they’re just trying to scroll through a list.

Feedback on Gestures:

Another somewhat confusing part of the left-side gesture recognition is that some apps have drawers you can open from this side.  On trick you can use to view these instead of accidentally going back in the OS is swiping to the right but also up at a 45 degree angle.  Not really something you should have to distinguish between as it feels like bad design, but that’s how things currently are.

Google says that feedback has played a lot into the gesture changes they’ve made with Q, and hopefully it works out in a manner that feels fluid and easy to use.  Every beta seems to have had a different version of gestures, so Google only has so long to get it all right!

There are currently dozens of different navigation styles in the Android ecosystem thanks to the fact that not all phones are made in house by Google.  But this is about to0 change with the release of Q.  Google announced at I/O this year that gesture navigation will be standardized and that other phones must adhere to it in order to run Android OS.  This will be a very welcome change for anyone who has felt lost swapping from one phone to another.  But it’s also high stakes to make sure that things are done right.

Getting Q Today:

System images for this beta are currently available for all Pixel devices.  If you have one then you’ll be running on Q soon enough, but if you’re looking to play around right away then go set it up and let us know what you think in the comments below.  We also still don’t know what Q’s snack name is.  It’s probably the most important part of any software, so stay tuned for that!

 

Pixel 4 or 4a?

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Pixel 4 or 4a?

Round 4 of leaks for Google’s flagship phone have begun to spill.  And with some of these designs have come talks of what to expect on the financial end of things.  In other words people want to know how much they have to pay.  Odds are we’ll be looking at a price in line with other high end phones like the iPhone 11 or Galaxy Note 10.  That being said, whether people are willing to pay this or not is another story.

Introducing the Pixel 3a:

If you tuned in to Google I/O this year, then you saw the unveiling of the Pixel 3a.  It was a lite version of the Pixel 3 that offered the same software on lower hardware specs.  Google marketed it as offering all the same impressive features as the 3 including low-light Night Sight and Duplex.  The bottom line of this was that the 3a was an almost top tier phone at a budget price. Unsurprisingly it sold quite well.

Starting at $399 instead of the original 3’s $799 it’s estimated that the 3a is responsible for some of Google’s successful second quarter earnings which they released on Thursday.  The company appears to be in a healthy state revealing $38.9 billion in revenue and $9.9 in profit.  Of that $32.6 was attributed to the ad portion of the business, but the “Other Revenues” section was up a significant amount ($6.2 billion vs $4.4 last year).  And since we already know the Pixel 3 lacked on sales a bit, the assumption is that the Pixel 3a performed quite a bit better.

People Speak With Their Money:

The Pixel 3a was likely a large cause of this spike in revenues.  Google CEO Sundar Pichai said that “With the launch of Pixel 3a in May, overall Pixel un it sales in Q2 grew more than two times year over year.”  We don’t have official numbers as they aren’t public, but clearly the company is happy with how the budget phone went over.

But this leads us to the question of where will people put their money when the Pixel 4 drops.  Likely we’ll see it prices at a similarly high price of $800-$1000, but that’s an outrageously high amount to pay for some of us.  If the Pixel 3 didn’t sell as well as the company hoped at that price they may try and lower it.  Or they may do the opposite and keep it as an exclusive item while subsequently revealing another budget phone.  And if that’s the case we each have to ask ourselves if it’s worth waiting a few months past the reveal to try and save a few hundred dollars.

Delayed Gratification:

My personal recommendation would be to hold off at least a month or two after release.  If you’re shopping for a Pixel 4 then there will likely be some huge discounts coming.  On Black Friday this past year you could get $400 off a Pixel 3 or 3XL.  And if you want to wait even longer I wouldn’t bet against a 4a being revealed as well.  Only time will tell!

What are your thoughts on the Pixel 4? Are there any special features you’re hoping to see in it for the expected prices?  Let us know in the comments below!

Android Dev Summit Is Coming!

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Android Dev Summit Is Coming!

If you’re an Android junky then you’re probably still coming off of this years Google I/O high.  We saw some really cool stuff we can leverage in our apps to create great user experiences.  But the development fun is far from over.  It’s already time to mark your calendars for another big upcoming development conference: Android Dev Summit 2019.

Last Year’s Summit:

Last year at Android’s annual developer conference we saw some big changes.  These included things like App Bundles in place of old APKs to reduce the size of your app.  On average app sizes were decreased 8% and some saw much bigger changes (30+ percent!). The idea behind an App Bundle is to only download the resources needed for your specific phone/version instead of downloading everything and then using what you need.  We’ll actually be going into detail on it in another post soon.

That was a big size change, but a big code change was focused around Jetpack.  Another topic we’ll dive into further with some tutorials if you haven’t applied it yet is updating your legacy support libraries to AndroidX. Basically your app functions the same way, but moving forward things are a lot cleaner on the Android support library!

What’s Coming This Year?

Those are some good topics that you should definitely be leveraging in your apps today, but the purpose of this post is to ask what may be coming this year.  And if Google I/O is any indicator of it, then the answer is a lot.  There’s not an official roster of topics posted yet, but we’ll likely be seeing deeper dives into some of the topics covered at I/O such as Android Q gestures and dark mode. And now with Kotlin as the preferred language for Android development I’m sure we’ll see some technical dives into what’s happening under the hood.

Along with some of these unique sessions come other perks for those of you attending in person.  There will be more hands on experiences with product demos, and you’ll be able to meet with members of Android’s team and discuss topics in more detail.  If you’re interested in attending then here’s a huge plus: ITS FREE!  Yep no purchase necessary for a ticket, but you do haver to be accepted by invite, so there are no guarantees.  Still, applications are open until August 15thso I’d highly recommend applying!

We’re Almost There:

There are a plethora of changes that could get whole sessions focused around them (permission changes, internal app sharing, optimizations).  And if you want to make sure you’re up to date on it then keep an eye on our page or on the official Android Dev Summit page.  If you can’t make it in person (Cali isn’t just around the corner for some of us), then don’t worry.  All the sessions will be live streamed on the site as well.

What are you most excited about for Android Dev Summit 2019? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Using Kotlin DSL For Gradle

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Using Kotlin DSL For Gradle

If you’re an Android developer then you’ve undoubtedly worked in the build.gradle file.  And you’ve undoubtedly wanted to throw things at your computer when it didn’t work as intended.  It’s a file (2 actually) essential to your app’s well being, but it’s written in Groovy which pretty much no one knows well.

This has created frustration for countless users when they can’t compile things correctly.  Thankfully there’s a better way, and as with most things Android the answer is Kotlin!

Kotlin Instead of Groovy:

Gradle recently released version 5.0, and along with this comes Gradle Kotlin DSL v1.0.  This is what lets us write our Gradle build scripts in Kotlin.  But before doing so we should ask if this is even a good idea.  Why would we want to write our build scripts in Kotlin?  Well for starters Groovy is a dynamically typed language (type is associated with run-time variables).  This means that it’s tough for Android Studio to warn you about much until after the script is already running.  Kotlin on the other hand is statically typed, so lots of bugs can be checked by the compiler before the script is ever run.

Along with this check comes autocomplete.  Android Studio will be able to suggest common method names and variables to you the way it already does in Kotlin or Java files you type in.  Couple this with the comfort that you already (hopefully) have with Kotlin, and it’s an instant improvement.

Prepping for the Leap:

So we’ve decided it may be worth looking into. What’s the first step? Step 1 setting yourself up to make the transition less painful.  Certain things are allowed in Groovy that aren’t in Kotlin, so if we make those conversions in the plain text, then converting the file will be easier.  One of these “things” is quotation marks. Groovy uses single quotations a lot, but those aren’t allowed in Kotlin.  So step one is replacing any single quotation marks you have with doubles.

Next you should make sure that your “apply plugin” uses are replaced with the plugin DSL block.  This is one plugin block that should encompass all of the plugins your project is using.  When your done here’s an example of what your plugins should look like:

There are unfortunately some limitations with this new plugin though, so if you encounter errors it is possible to still use the legacy plugin.

The final thing you’ll need to do is assign variables and call methods.  What I mean by this is that since Groovy doesn’t require you to explicitly write the = when declaring a variable or the () when running a method, these changes need to be made for Kotlin.  Here are a few examples:

Taking The Leap:

Ok, now we’ve made our prep changes, so hopefully things go smoothly with the actual changes.  We have three files we need to rename to include .kts. Our two build.gradle files now become build.gradle.kts, and our settings.gradle file should become settings.gradle.kts.  Rename these files and try to compile the project. Fingers crossed nothing erroneous pops up, and if that’s the case then congratulations you officially have a project running on Kotlin DSL!

These are just the basics, and I’m sure if your project is complex at all there will be a few more jumps in the process to Kotlin.  If that’s the case Gradle has documentation on their website that helps walk through how to go about some of these common changes.  I’d highly recommend checking them out if you feel lost.  And if you don’t need them, then your app should run just fine now, and any time you make changes to Gradle you can do so in Kotlin.

 

 

 

And So The Pixel 4 Leaks Begin

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And So The Pixel 4 Leaks Begin

Last Fall I hopped on board the Pixel 3 bandwagon.  I was overdue for an upgrade and wanted a cutting-edge device.  Fast-forward more than half a year and I’m still incredibly pleased with the purchase.  That being said, I won’t be upgrading any time during the next year which is a shame because the Pixel 4 looks every bit as cool!

Pixel 4:

We’re still a long way out from the 4thgeneration device from actually dropping, but the first leak has just dropped revealing a peek into what the future holds. It shouldn’t come as a surprise, as Google phones are notorious for being some of the most-leaked in the industry.

The first Pixel 4 leaks are thanks to Pricebaba and OnLeaks.  Below is the image revelaing what the next phone will likely look like. It’s based on “early prototyping schematics”, so obviously nothing is set in stone.  That being said it’s probably still a good indicator of what’s to come.

The Design/Specs:

There’s a lot that’s still in the unknown for the Pixel 4, but these renderings tell us a lot all the same. Firstly, it’s impossible to not notice the large square camera module.  This will either have two or three cameras inside of it.  Pixel phones have always been known for their astonishing camera capabilities, so we’ll likely see some more improvements on that front.

What you may have not noticed immediately is what’s notthere.  The 4’s rendering is lacking a fingerprint sensor on the back of the device.  So the current rumor is that we may see an in-display fingerprint sensor.  Along with the changes we see some constants like the USB-C port and power/volume buttons on the right side. Then on the specs side there is talk that it will have 6GB of RAM and 128GB of storage at a minimum.

The Pixel 4 will likely launch in October and feature the newest Android software (Q).  While I may not be due for an upgrade when it comes out, I’m excited to see any advances made in the industry!  What are your thoughts on the Pixel 4?  Do you love or hate the design?  Let us know in the comments below.

An Intro To Flutter

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An Intro To Flutter

When Google I/O came and went in May one of the topics that captured a lot of interest was Flutter. Offering a whole new option for cross platform code, Flutter has been gaining traction over the past few years. I talked about it briefly a few weeks ago, but let’s dive more into the details of why it may be worth learning.

What is Flutter?

First, let’s get a quick primer of what Flutter actually is.  It’s a toolkit developed in 2017 by Google that allows you to write code for both Android and iOS devices.  You can write code once, and then implement it anywhere.  And by anywhere, I mean Android, iOS, web, and desktop.  Already if you’re a freelancer I’m sure you see some appeal here!

It’s written in Dart which hasn’t been too popular of a language in the past, but Flutter is breaking that trend.  It’s been featured at I/O for a few years straight now, and Google uses it for internal apps, so it’s not going away any time soon.  The framework revolves around widgets.  Everything in a Flutter app is a widget.  Widgets describe what a view should look like given its current state, and when that state changes a widget rebuilds its description.  It sounds kind of foreign until you dive in.

Let’s see some code!

I won’t waste time going through how to set up Flutter on your computer.  Here’s a good link to walk you through that (don’t worry it’s super simple).  For my personal use I’ve been using Flutter in Visual Studio Code, but you can also develop in other IDE’s such as Android Studio if you’re more comfortable with those. To get started run the command flutter create hello_world.  This will take care of everything for you creating a new application named hello_world.  To run it, type cd hello_worldto enter that directory, and then type flutter runto kick things off.

Congratulations!  You’re officially looking at your first flutter app. Whether you ran it on an iPhone or an Android device (or somewhere else) you should see an app that looks like this:

So what made this app? Well, this is from the default code that Flutter made for us.  In your navigation sidebar you should see folders for things such as android, ios, and lib.  There are some others as well, but I point these out because at its core you’ll work in the lib folder.  And the others will allow you to transport that code into iOS and Android phones. That’s REALLY oversimplifying it, but it’s not wrong!

main.dart:

Let’s open the lib folder, and inside we’ll see one file named main.dart.  This is the core of your app right now.  If you open up main.dart you’ll see what is creating the widgets currently showing on your phone.  For anyone just reading and not following along, here’s what it looks like:

In here we can see pretty hefty comments explaining everything.  The app starts by calling the method runApp() and passing in an instance of our class MyApp.  And as we can see right below that, MyApp is a StatelessWidget.  There are stateful and stateless widgets in Flutter, and we’ll go into them down the road, but for now just know what a widget is.

One really cool thing about Flutter is hot reloading.  When you want to rerun an app and see any changes you’ve made, you only have to recompile widgets that have changed their state.  The end result of this is incredibly fast reload speeds (milliseconds). Go ahead and try this out.  Under theprimarySwatchattribute change it from Colors.blue to Colors.red. Once you’ve done that save the project and in the terminal press “r”. Instantly you’ll see the theme of your app change from blue to red.  It’s really that simple to reload!

I’ve loved my experience thus far with Flutter because of the way it is structured and hot-reloading. There’s a whole world of development to explore, but if you get started and want to let us know what you like/dislike about it let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Google Glasses 2.0 In Sight

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Google Glasses 2.0 In Sight

You guys all remember Google Glasses right?  The augmented reality headset designed to look like regular glasses, but do so much more? Well you might, but you probably didn’t get to know them too well because they flopped pretty hard in 2014. But don’t worry, Google Glasses 2.0 are here and look promising!

2ndTry’s the Charm:

The Glass Enterprise Edition 2 is on the market for $999.  Kind of.  It’s not being sold direct to consumers yet, but instead is entering the corporate world. The goal of these glasses is to “meet the demands of the growing market for wearables in the workplace” according to a post by Google.  Of course given enough time I’m sure we’ll see them used for fun too!

When Google first released the glasses, they were aimed at the public, but they received a lot of backlash for issues related to privacy.  It also didn’t help the glasses didn’t always work as intended.  Due to the complaints the focus turned towards professional uses such as surgery or factory work.  The business focus is sticking around for 2.0 as Google attempts to nail down a target market before expanding.

The Specs (Get it??):

2.0 actually looks a lot like the original Glass design.  Instead of a full headset like Microsoft’s HoloLens, Glass actually looks like a simple pair of black thick rimmed glasses.  But it can do quite a bit more than regular spectacles.  It has a new processor, a souped up camera, and a better battery for longer life.

Google says that the new headset incorporates computer vision and advanced machine learning capabilities.  Using Lens it can offer features like sign translation or info about restaurants nearby. It runs on Android, so there’s no reason to start moving away from the core topics off app development.  Instead they’ll be incorporated into newer forms of technology like this one.

Putting the Competition in Focus:

Unlike some of the other headsets we’ve seen in recent years, Google’s Glass Enterprise Edition 2 actually looks like a pair of regular glasses.  So regardless of what it can do, that’s already a good step in the right direction.  The less invasive a piece of technology can be the better from a user’s experience. It’s available in a frameless version or with a Smith Optics supplied safety frame (for use in manufacturing type jobs).

Glass is augmented reality focused with this smaller hardware, whereas some other entrants have focused on virtual reality.  Take the Vive headset for example.  It’s a complete headset that wraps around your head and obscures any vision unless it’s turned on.  The end result of course being that you can see into whatever virtual world is created. Glass instead builds on top of the real world.  In this sense it’s more like Magic Leap.  And with strides in ARCore over the past few years the ways it can interact with everyday objects are probably pretty impressive.  It’s important to consider this when thinking of competing forces. There are multiple headsets, but they also don’t necessary completely rule out one another.

What are your thoughts on the new Google glasses?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Google I/O Revisited

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Google I/O Revisited

Last week we wrote about Google I/Ocoming to an end.  We highlighted some of the cool new features that were unveiled and explored upcoming technologies.  There was tons to show on stage, but of course it’s not magic.  Every tech innovation has logic working under the hood.  And as developer’s Google I/O is the perfect place to be to see how some of this logic works.

From A Developer’s POV:

First off, there’s a ton of other topics covered, but we’ll mainly be focusing on Android development in this post.  But don’t worry.  That still leaves us with tons of talking material!  Let’s start with the most fundamental topic of Android’s OS.  We saw Android Q up on the big stage at I/O, and with it are some new things that developers are going to need to consider when writing their code.

Permission changes are a big one.  An entire talk was dedicated to privacy changestaking place on Q, and immediately after it was another talk discussing location permission. In the past when you wanted access to a user’s location for your app you simple asked for it and they said yes or no. Q brings a 3rdoption into the mix.  It’s actually been around for a while on iOS devices, but starting on Q user’s will have two options to allow an app access to their location.  They can either say yes all the time, or they can grant permission only when an app is in use.  This way if there’s an app you don’t think should be tracking you when you’re not using it…well it won’t!

There were also sessions talking about new Q features such as gesture navigation and dark mode.  Yes, believe it or not Android is ditching the back button! Another iOS style move, but given time we may think it’s for the best.

New Ways to Develop:

The topic that has interested me the most since the end of I/O has been Flutter.  And if you haven’t heard of it before, here’s where to get started.  Flutter is an incredibly cool toolkit to help you write one codebase and run it on both iOS and Android apps.  Yep, write it once, ship it twice.  It was developed by Google in 2017 and since then the company has not stopped pushing it, so it doesn’t look like it’s about to fade away.  It allows for fast development, flexible UI’s and a new way of thinking while you code.

My favorite feature it the hot-reload.  Since you only have to compile changes you’ve made in the code, rerunning your app is insanely fast.  By insanely fast I mean less than a second.  This can allow for a whole new approach to coding as you constantly tweak minute things and hit run to instantly see how they change your app’s appearance.  Exploring it is a great way to learn.  I’ll be writing a post later this week in extensive detail on what Flutter has to offer because it’s so cool.

New Ways to Share:

From a developer’s standpoint there is more to life than just code.  You have to do something with the finished product, right?  There are people you need to share it with. Whether those are friends, work associates, or the world, the more options available to share your app the better.

We saw some cool things come in this realm at the talk “Customizable Delivery With the App Bundle and Easy Sharing of Test Builds”.  First, we saw how shrinking your app can dramatically increase the number of downloads that you get (1% increase for every 3MB your app sheds).  And with this we saw how to do just this by adopting App Bundles.

My favorite part of this talk though was about sharing test builds.  Taking things one step further than Alpha and Beta testing, you can now “upload” a build to the store and share the url with anyone you would like. The build is only accessible via that link though and doesn’t register as your regular app on the Play Store, so your secret is still safe if you’re doing internal testing.  Let’s say you want everyone at the office to give the new version a go before rubber stamping it.  This is designed for just that.

That’s a Wrap!

Wrapping up there were tons and tons of cool features from a development standpoint covered this year. And Google employees went over how to develop each one of them on stage in liver demos.  I would highly recommend checking out some of the footage if you haven’t yet.

What was your favorite part of Google I/O 2019?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

Google I/O, That’s a Wrap!

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Google I/O, That’s a Wrap!

Now that it’s come and passed Google I/O 2019 has left us amped for the coming year.  We got to see some amazing demos covering topics from Augmented Reality to new devices like the Nest Hub Max.  I’m still trying to wrap my head around some of the material, but it’s safe to say we have a good year of development ahead of us all.  Let’s take a look at some of the highlights:

New Devices have Dropped:

As mentioned just above Google released the Nest Hub Max.  A home assistant with a 10-inch display to welcome you in the morning with your daily routine.  At the keynote we saw some of its incredible features such as facial recognition and motion sensing.  Depending on who the screen sees it will display their own welcome screen with important information.  Along with the personalized assistant and a stunning speaker comes a motion sensor that can pause music at the flick of a wrist.

The Nest Hub Max wasn’t the only device dropped at I/O though.  While we technically saw it out a few months ago, the Pixel 3a was officially announced at a starting price of $599. Google’s sales of the Pixel 3 were not quite what they hoped for.  Butt they’re aiming high again with the 3a.  On stage we saw a demo of its camera in low lighting compared to an iPhone X, and the difference was pretty apparent.

Android Q and Dark Mode:

Q is in beta 3 right now, but we learned quite a bit about it at I/O.  There was a whole session discussing how gesture recognizers will be replacing the back and home buttons on Android devices.  I’m sure we’ll see a lot of smartphone carriers start to make full screen devices to reflect this change.  Instead of a back-button user’s will slide in from the left side of the screen.   And now to go home user’s will slide up.  It’s somewhat similar to Pie, but removing the back button is a pretty drastic change.

And then from a visual appearance we also have Dark Mode.  You can watch the talk online to see how to prep your app for the new UI changes coming with Q.  Basically, there is another attribute you can add on to your views to account for if a user has selected dark mode.  If so then you can make your app fit two different color scheme flows.  It’s pretty easy on the eyes!

Duplex and Live Subtitles:

Last year we saw Duplex make its debut on the main stage.  Since then it’s been rolled out to Pixel phones everywhere for use.  Duplex allows the Google assistant to call a restaurant/business on your behalf and talk with a human on the other end.  It will schedule your calendar for you and notify you when an appointment has been successfully made.  Insanely cool.

And now Duplex is going a step further to take care of things on the web.  It will be able to navigate websites for services like car rentals and fill out all of your information for you.  The end result is very similar to what we saw before. But with being able to fill out information online, a human was never contacted on the business side.  We will now be able to have computers interacting with computers and all you have to do is ask you phone to get you a car for next week.

Another amazing feature on the AI side of things is live video being translated to text.  So if you’re hard of hearing or want to watch a video in a quiet place, Google will be able to convert the audio file from a video into text on the screen live for you.

There are a ton of new features that came about in I/O this year.  Too many to count, but we’ll be writing about a lot of them over the next few weeks!  Stay tuned for another post soon about some of the Android development topics that were covered.

 

 

Google I/O Coming In Hot

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Google I/O Coming In Hot

It’s that time of year again.  The time when Android developers from around the world gather into Mountain View, CA.  The reason?  Google I/O of course!  We’re less than a week out from the annual developer conference where people connect to see what’s coming in the next year.  The scheduler is up, and it looks like a promising conference.

 

Google I/O 2018:

 

We covered last year’s conferencein detail here, and the plan is to do the same this time around.  Last year everything seemed to link back to one of three core themes:  Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, and the newest Android version at the time (Pie).  We saw a breathtaking demo of Duplex on the main stage as it called a hair salon and booked an appointment with a human on the other end.  Sure, this took a while to make it to our phones, but just under a year later it’s available on Pixel devices!

We also saw some cool demos of what Google Maps had coming in terms of Augmented Reality.  And as you’ll see in a second the AR train is still going strong.  We learned about features like Adaptive Battery and Brightness in Android P designed to improve a user’s experience through machine learning.  So on and so forth.

 

This Year’s Agenda:

 

Let’s turn towards the future now.  Google I/O 2019 has a slew of similar sessions ahead focusing on Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, and Android Q.  The conference covers many other topics as well, but these are still core themes. Along with them gaining a lot of attention this year are Kotlin and Firebase.

 

Kotlin was adopted as an official programming language for Android a while back, and the community LOVES it.  If you’re interested in getting started with Kotlin or app development, you should check out Phonlab’s Android App Development course. Kotlin offers a great way to improve your code’s readability and efficiency, so in this day and age it’s a must have skill for mobile developers.

 

Our selections:

 

Unless you’re locked in for a few days, you probably don’t have time to view all the materials that will be available at this year’s session.  Additionally not everything is Android based.  There are tons of other interesting topics that look like they’ll be discussed this year, but here are a few hand selected ones I’d recommend for those of you interested in taking your Android development to the next level:

 

Tuesday:

10:00-1:45pm Google Keynote/Developer Keynote

2:00-3:00pm What’s New in Android

Wednesday:

10:30-11:30am What’s New in Architecture Components

12:30-1:30pm What’s New in Kotlin on Android

5:30-6:30pm Android Studio: Tips and Tricks

Thursday:

10:30-11:30am Motional Intelligence: Build Smarter Animations

11:30-12:30pm Kotlin Under the Hood: Understand the Internals

 

All of the sessions will be available eventually on YouTube, but to guarantee that you can see some and benefit from them I’d recommend tuning in as they are live.  And if you don’t have time to go that in depth, don’t worry we’ll be covering them here!

 

What are you most excited for about Google I/O 2019?  Let us know in the comments below.

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