Android 11 Beta Gets Postponed

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Android 11 Beta Gets Postponed

Android 11 first made its debut as a developer beta back in March, and it was all set to go public at the start of June.  Unfortunately, the pattern of event delays and cancellations will be continuing with the new release.  The public beta has officially been postponed. And most Pixel users will have to wait before seeing what’s on the horizon.

We’ll Get There Soon:

Yesterday the Android Developers Twitter account tweeted “We are excited to tell you more about Android 11, but now is not the time to celebrate.  We are postponing the June 3rd event and beta release.  We’ll be back with more on Android 11, soon.”  Originally set to be revealed at Google I/O 2020 (also cancelled), the beta would have taken the current developer beta and made it public to the world.

What does that mean?  Right now anyone with a Pixel can still get Android 11 on their phone, it just takes a little work. Here’s a post about how to flash your device. Flashing your phone allows you to load a different version of Android as long as you have access to the system image.  And that’s available on developer.android.com for anyone who wants it.  There are a few critical things to note before flashing your device. The biggest being that it erases all data from your device.  So if you wish to go this route make sure you have everything backed up!

Android 11 For Now:

Otherwise you can just hold off on upgrading to Android 11 until it’s a more streamlined process (i.e. when the public beta is released). But in the meantime you can still start learning about some of the new features that Android 11 is introducing.  From Facebook-esque chat bubbles to new notification interactions, there’s plenty to explore.

That being said, it doesn’t seem there is anything revolutionary being released in 11.  All the same its changes are welcome.  Improvements to things like permission requests and user security are always a good thing, and for the most part shouldn’t require legacy apps to change too much.  As mentioned in another post here at RootJunky an expansion on Project Mainline will also allow Google to update key parts of the OS via Google Play Store.  These will seem like subtle changes to the user, but their impacts can be huge.

Hopefully we’ll see Android 11 go public in the near future, but for now we’ll have to be patient.  What are your thoughts on the new beta?  Let us know in the comments below.

Android 11 Has Made Its Debut

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Android 11 Has Made Its Debut

 

Gone are the days of Android versions with dessert themed names.  But by no means does that mean the end of Android!  Google is still keeping to their schedule of a new version every year, and 2020 marks the year of Android 11.  It won’t have a fun name, but this version may contain some long-awaited features for the world’s most popular operating system.

Android 11 Today:

Google has launched their first developer preview of Android 11.  What does this mean?  It doesn’t actually mean that you have to be a developer to view it, just that you can’t download the new version in the traditional sense.  Instead you can utilize the system images for Google’s Pixel devices to flash the software onto your phone.  For more detail on that check out this post.

Let’s take a look at what 11 is going to bring to the table. Google’s VP of Engineering Dave Burke spoke about it saying “With Android 11 we’re keeping our focus on helping users take advantage of the latest innovations, while continuing to keep privacy and security a top priority.”  The version is focused on helping manage sensitive files in an era where privacy feels non-existent.  For permissions that typically require user approval, Google is expanding their “Just this once” option to features such as accessing your contacts or camera.  Something introduced last year for locations that has proven to be useful.

New Developer APIs:

Android 11 actually seems to be bringing a lot of new features to the table right out of the box.  New APIs available to developers include 5G bandwith estimates, conversation sections in the notification shade, and fun chat bubbles that behave similarly to the Facebook chat we’ve all more than likely used in the past.

There are also improvements on existing features such as dark mode and NFC.  This will hopefully help with the issue of jumping back and forth between apps that have/have not implemented dark mode (it’s tough on your pupils!).  And an expansion on Project Mainline will allow Google to update key components of the OS via the Google Play Store instead of waiting for device manufacturers to release full rollouts.  More updates = better user experiences.

When we’ll learn more:

Unfortunately Google I/O has been cancelled this year as an in-person event, but the online portion will still be available.  It’s always a great event to see the new pieces of tech that Google has been working on both. We’re sure to learn more about Android 11 in May, so stay tuned to hear updates then.

What are your thoughts on what the latest Android version has to offer? It’s still being refined and will likely be officially available in Q3 of 2020.  While it’s just “Android 11”, we’d technically be on R.  So if you want to brainstorm what a good dessert would be for this version’s name let us know in the comments below!

Android Quits on Q

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Android Quits on Q

Well, Android Q has officially been named.  At least, the next version of Android has been named.  In a shocking turn of events Google has decided to move away from its tradition of naming the OS after desserts.  Instead of any Q-esque dessert, Android 10 has been announced.  After 10 years of dessert names, it’s all numbers from here on.

Android 10:

With Android 10 as the next version, things will simply increment up from here (11 and so on).  I guess it had to come to an end eventually, but I think it’s safe to say most of us expected this to happen closer to Z than Q. The world needs more desserts!

As for whythe naming pattern changed, it’s not just because Q is a hard letter to match with a dessert.  Google’s VP of product management for Android said that it’s because desserts aren’t inclusive enough.  “We have some good names, but in each and every case they leave a part of the world out.”

Android is a global brand, and as such they don’t want to pick desserts that are regional and other people can’t relate to.  At least that’s what they say…I still think no one could come up with the right thing for Q!

Android’s Rebranding:

While the naming convention has changed, don’t worry!  The classic Android robot still exists.  He received an updated logo but it’s nothing too drastic. A few small tweaks for him and some larger changes for the Android word itself.  Now in all black, the logo is supposed to be more readable on small devices.  Changing it to a sleek black will help with that issue.

And of course it wouldn’t be any fun if the images were just introduced and then that was it.  Here’s a fun little video released by Android showing off the new look. The video emphasizes heavily that we’ve been growing together as a community, and that shouldn’t stop anytime soon.  While it’s a little cheesy, I have to agree with the sentiment.  There is a sort of bond between Android users and especially as a developer it’s been really fun to watch it change over the years.  Here’s hoping Android 10 continues that trend!

What are your thoughts on the new naming convention?  How about the logo?  Let us know in the comments below.

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