Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

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Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

Android is the world’s most popular mobile operating system, and for good reason.  It’s created both high end and affordable options for users worldwide to experience what it has to offer.  And what is has to offer has been time and time again improved upon.  That being said, improvements are always happening in the tech world, and 5 years from now Android might not hold it’s place as #1.  Here’s a curve ball for you: I’m not talking about Apple.  Android’s upcoming replacement may be Fuchsia.

Wait…what the heck is Fuchsia?

For a few years now a stealthy group on engineers at Google have been working on Fuchsia.  The project came into existence as a potential solution to Android’s limitations.  It’s being designed with voice interactions and security updates in mind where the current Android platform falls short.  And while this has been quiet, it hasn’t been locked down.  Some of the code has been open source since 2016 and outside app developers have been allowed to experiment with it.

The Fuchsia team has a higher goal than just more efficient software though.  They’re attempting to design something that will make interaction with all in-house gadgets a fluid experience.  Imagine a single operating system that controls all your speakers, tv, and other residential tech.  Now imagine also being able to interact with all of these devices by speaking to them.  Your house becomes a sentient being, somewhat like this post we wrote a few months back.

So Android will be gone in 5 years?

No, I definitely exaggerated in that first paragraph.  5 years would be an insanely quick turnaround for Android to completely fall off the map.  Android currently dominates as king with roughly 75% market share compared to Apple’s 15%.  Still, it’s far from perfect.  There are performance, privacy, and security concerns with out of date Android phones that need to be addressed, and a new software like Fuchsia could help jump that transition forward.  All the same we’ll be seeing Android phones for quite some time still, and P hasn’t even reached the market!

Fuschia is being developed with audio interactions at its core.  There haven’t been any apps built on it at a serious commercial level yet, but rumors are flying that we’ll be seeing a YouTube app with voice command soon.  My prediction is that over the next year or two Fuchsia is going to grow in the open source community until its eventual official launch, at which point we’re going to see a boom (hopefully a quicker boom than new Android version adoption rates!).  I’ll be keeping a close eye on it, so stay tuned for more updates.  And if you have any thoughts about Fuchsia or it’s potential let us know here!

 

Android P Releases Its Final Beta

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Android P Releases Its Final Beta

While Android Oreo is just starting to hit its stride, Android P is making news too.  This week Google released the final beta preview of Android P before it’s official launch.  We’ve seen a few beta previews so far this year, and this one should be even closer to what P will look like when it launches.

According to Android VP Dave Burke this beta includes “final system behaviors” meaning Google’s new gesture-based navigation will be locked in and shipping with Android 9.0.  Of course there’s always room for improvement, and that’s a large reason betas exist, but this should be stable for installation on your main phone.  Google hasn’t mentioned any known bugs, so if you have a phone that can handle it out get the beta and let us know what you think!

What’s new in P?

We’ve talked before about Android P and what features it has to offer.  Spoiler: they’re awesome.  P offers a series of features that revolve around the idea of predictive analytics.

There’s an adaptive battery that takes into account what time of day you typically are running your apps, and if it doesn’t think you’ll be using them any time soon it shuts them off to save energy.  Couple this with the screen brightness which auto adjusts based on what you typically set it to throughout the day, and you’re looking at a much longer lasting battery life.

Apart from performance improvements, we also have completely new features that enable us to experience things differently.  One I’ve talked about before at length is Wi-Fi RTT.  Round Trip Time is a method of really getting to know your exact current location.  It’s accurate within about a meter, and does so by triangulating between multiple Wi-Fi access points nearby.  This improved location methodology offers some cool opportunities that just depend on how creative developers want to get.

Privacy Improvements:

There are also security improvements that come with P, and in an everchanging world of privacy that’s a key improvement.  Have you ever gotten a notification saying an app was running in the background when you didn’t think you’d been using it?  How about having an app crash in the background even though you haven’t opened it in ages?  That’s never a good thing to see.  P will prevent idle apps from performing actions such as accessing your camera (yes this is a thing!!).  P offers a series of security upgrades that limit what apps can do in the background in an effort to help protect user privacy.

How to get P?

First off, I’m so ready to stop calling it P and use it’s actual name. Unfortunately we’ll have to wait a little longer for that.  But if you want to get the beta on your phone today you can check it out on Android’s developer website here.  Give it a try and let us know your thoughts on it!  We’ll be sure to continue writing about developments in the software, so stay tuned for more.

 

 

 

Oreo: Coming Soon To A Phone Near You?

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Oreo: Coming Soon To A Phone Near You?

It’s been just over 10 months since Android’s newest version (Oreo) began rolling out to devices. Almost a year, so let’s take a second to see how it’s doing. Well…it may be performing really well in terms of quality, but quantity is lacking.

How bad are we talking?

Every month Google releases Android’s distribution numbers showing how many devices are running each version of their operation system, and according to July’s numbers this year Oreo is active on 12.1% of active devices. As a point of reference, that puts Oreo at the 4th place position behind Nougat, Marshmallow, and Lollipop. There’s no denying this is a pretty sluggish speed for rolling things out (but to be fair it’s 0.4% ahead of where Nougat was during it’s growth phase).

So the trends show that new Android versions typically take more than a year to become the most used release, but this begs the question of why? Oreo offers some pretty cool new features such as picture in picture app usage and notification channels. Apart from battery life there aren’t too many reasons user’s would want to avoid upgrading to the newly offered software. But the issue is that it’s not actually offered to all users. There have been rollout calendars following which phones have adopted Oreo since it’s release, and the list of devices has grown slowly up until this month.

It’s Not The User’s Fault

A large part of why device updates are so slow is how fragmented the Android market currently is. Manufacturers often won’t bother with updating older pieces of hardware because it takes time and energy on their part that isn’t being put towards everything new. The end result is user’s being left high and dry. Even some new devices are hesitant to adopt the new software until it’s tried and true. User’s are able to flash their devices and test out other softwares if they so desire, but it’s not exactly mainstream to do so (as cool as it is!)

The bright side is that if you look at things over time they’re starting to ramp up exponentially. 5 months ago Oreo’s adoption rate was hovering around 1% (5 months after it’s release). Things were looking abysmal then even compared to other version’s growth rates, but thanks to a wave of updates this past month things are starting to look back on track.

Statistics Aren’t Perfect

It’s also important to note that the Android Developer dashboard I linked above relies heavily on Google’s Play Store to collect its data. This means that not every device running a version of Android is actually being accounted for in these numbers. The Play Store currently isn’t available in China (A $35 billion/year app market to be missing), and there are a few other factors at play attributing to uncounted devices. All the same it’s clear that Oreo is at about the same speed of rolling out as Nougat was, and we’ll likely see it enter the top 3 within the next few months. I for one am already looking forward to Android P though 🙂

Have you gotten Oreo on your device yet? What are your thoughts on either it’s performance or it’s rollout speed? Let us know in the comments below!

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