Magic Leap is Moving into Mobile

Share if the site was helpful

Magic Leap is Moving into Mobile

Augmented reality has been all the rage the past few years.  From headsets to mobile apps we’ve seen it start to infiltrate every piece of technology.  One of the companies behind this infiltration is Magic Leap.  They released their first headset last August after nearly 10 years of development work.  And now it seems their looking to up the ante by bridging the gap between headsets and phones.

Magic Leap’s History:

Magic Leap has been flying under the radar for quite some time now.  Their central product is a head-mounted virtual retina display which superimposes 3D images over real-world objects.  That’s the fancy way of saying AR goggles.  And fancy they are!  The company has raised more than $1.4 billion in investment capital since 2010 and in 2016 was valued at $4.5 billion by Forbes.

So the company has some serious backers, and in 2018 when they released their goggles for the first time they were available only to investors.  I wish I could say I’ve tried them on, but I unfortunately can’t attest to their experience.  CNBC, however, was granted an exclusive trial run of the goggles and the description is quite amazing.

Their tester wrote about how he was able to “place” a tv anywhere in a room to watch an NBA game. What’s more he could also place a 3D rendering of the entire game on the floor and walk around it seeing live gameplay from every angle.  Seriously, just think about this for a second and all the possibilities it holds!

Seeking AR Mobile Developers:

The goggles can already do some pretty sweet things, and when they came out in August they came with a mobile support app.  The main purpose of this was to help users with setup, but it seems now Magic Leap is hoping to go further.  Earlier this month they posted a job description for a senior software engineer with experience in mobile AR.  The description says

“In this role, you will help build a cross-platform framework that enables large scale shared AR experiences between mobile devices (iOS, Android) and Magic Leap devices. Your work will include implementing high-performance, production quality AR and computer vision algorithms, and designing and building the Magic Leap mobile SDK.”

ARKit and ARCore:

It also lists the developer should have experience with ARKit and ARCore, the AR frameworks by Apple and Google respectively.  The company’s CCO spoke on this saying that undoubtedly the whole world will not use Magic Leap’s goggles, but they should all have access to a smaller version of the experience.  Rio Caraeff said “…if there’s a 500 foot tall dragon in Central Park, you know we all want to see the dragon, not just the people with Magic Leap. And so we need an interoperability solution.”

Regardless of if you’re interested in Magic Leap as a company, the simple fact that AR is penetrating every corner of our world is undeniable.  That being said, the sooner you get in on the action the more likely you are to ride the wave up!  What are your thoughts on Magic Leap’s goggles?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

I/O 2019 Is Upon Us

Share if the site was helpful

I/O 2019 Is Upon Us

Mark your calendars, Google 1/0 2019 has been announced!  The company’s annual developer conference will be kicking off May 7th and run though the 9th.  Google tweeted about the event yesterday, and as usual it looks like there are some exciting things on the agenda.

Flash Back To 2018:

Last year’s I/O was a particularly exciting one, and there were a few core themes behind it.  While buzz-wordy, the event revolved around the ideas of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence.  We got to see demonstrations of Google’s Duplex making a phone call, as well as learning about what Android P brought to the table.  It offered improved battery life, brightness, and app suggestions to refine the mobile experience for users.

Up This Year:

Last year had a lot of interesting concepts, and this year is sure to be even more impressive.  It’s far too early to say everything that will be taking place in this year’s reveals, but there are a few things we can be certain are on the agenda.  The first of these is of course a new version of Android.  Following it’s alphabetical trend, Q is next on the roster.

We’ve talked a little about Q here before but very little has been revealed thus far.  Rumors have it that the new version will be featuring an expansive Dark Theme for battery saving and, well because dark themes are all the rage right now.  There is also discussion about a change to the android activity life cycle to include a multi-resume.  This could allow for easier interaction with multiple apps at the same time when using split screen on your phone.

Watch and Learn:

Many believe we are about to see the reveal of a Pixel Watch.  iOS has definitely been the dominant culture when it comes to accessories for your primary device, but that’s all the more reason for Google to try and match it.  No leaks have come yet regarding what it will look like but news that Google bought $40 million of smartwatch technology and researchers from Fossil is a definite hint that big things are coming.

There are also bound to be Google Assistant improvements this year, an we could see these play a big role in how the watch functions for things like speech-to-text. Duplex was demoed last year but we haven’t seen to much of it in the real world up until the last few months either.  I would predict the artificial intelligence of the Assistant opens up a few new doors this year.

Fuchsia is the Future:

And of course there is the ever prevalent mystery that is Fuchsia in development.  Said to be Android’s replacement, Fuchsia is on the rise and will likely be utilized in some demos this year.  It’s a ways off from being the new OS for smartphones, but it’s been development for a few years now and it is starting to make it’s way into the limelight.

For the fourth consecutive year the event will be held at the Shoreline Amphitheater in Mountain View, California.  What are you most excited about for Google I/O 2019?  Do you have any predictions about what we may see this year?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

Microsoft Moving Out Of Mobile

Share if the site was helpful

Microsoft Moving Out Of Mobile

It’s the end of an era for Microsoft phones.  While back in 2017 Microsoft announced they were done developing new hardware for their devices, now they’ve decided to end support altogether.  Security and software updates will be coming to a close In December of this year.  It’s time to move on to an Android or iPhone.

Failure To Launch:

The company once had huge plans for their mobile phones, but things never really took off quite as expected. The Windows Phone 7 launched in 2010, but now less than a decade later Microsoft is moving out of the mobile hardware industry. Back then Microsoft touted that the emergence of their phones would be the death of both BlackBerry and iPhone. One of these has come true, but the other…not so much.

There are many reasons for the Windows phones not resonating with users, but a hefty one was the lack of apps in the app store.  Many popular apps on Android and iOS devices simply weren’t available for Windows users. Now Microsoft has decided to bypass this issue and instead focus on providing its services to other carriers. 

The Future of Mobile For Microsoft:

Microsoft phones may be done for, but the company’s future in mobile is far from over.  They’ve invested heavily in making Office products available on both Android and iPhones.  They also have a partnership with Samsung, who sells some of their Galaxy phones with Office pre-installed.

Android seems to be the mobile choice that Microsoft has embraced.  With an Android launcher and upcoming app mirroring support, users moving away from Microsoft phones will likely lean towards that option.

Moving Forwards:

It’s no huge surprise that Microsoft dropped support for Windows 10 mobile, since the same thing happened for the Windows Phone 8.1 in 2017.  While Microsoft will be playing a role in mobile phones down the road, their attention has shifted elsewhere.  They’re still a mega player in the tech world (we just wrote about their changes to GitHub).

Still, Microsoft is urging users to move to either one of the two main players.  They said “With the Windows 10 Mobile OS end of support, we recommend that customers move to a supported Android or iOS device.  Microsoft’s mission statement to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more, compels us to support our Mobile apps on those platforms and devices.”

What are your thoughts on the end of Microsoft mobile support?  Will these phones be missed or is it best that Microsoft focus their efforts elsewhere?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

en English
X