Android Isn’t Going Anywhere

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Android Isn’t Going Anywhere

There’s been a buzz going around this week that Android is dead.  Well dying actually, but everyone is claiming that Android’s reign is coming to an end and Google is moving forward.  If we take a few moments to look at the bigger picture then we’ll see Android has a long way to go before it’s no more.  The most popular operating system in the world is here to stay for a long time.

The Rumor:

The rumors pertain to the Made by Google 2018 keynote that just took place in New York City.  During this keynote the word “Android” was not said, and many have taken this as a subtle sign that Google is looking to replace the brand.  This coupled with the fact that “Android Messages” was recently renamed to “Messages” on the Play Store, and bloggers everywhere ate it up. 

Many believe that Chrome OS is set to take over Android’s claim as king since that was front and center at the keynote.  Google told a whole story about Chrome OS’s history and why it belongs on tablets. They also marketed it as a great alternative for your desktop instead of Windows and macOS.

Do the rumors stand?

While it may be true that we didn’t hear the word “Android” explicitly said, let’s not forget that there is still Android related tech coming out.  Android Auto is rolling out to a ton of new cars this year, Android Pie was released at the start of this fall, and Google just adopted Kotlin as a new official Android programming language.

Along with all these new developments we have the Google Pixel 3 and 3 XL that have just come out running Android Pie.  Sure they would have to run it since that’s the newest version to come out and it’s Google’s flagship phone.  But let’s remember that that’s the newest version to come out and it’s Google’s flagship phone.  People are discussing the death of Android less than a week after a new huge phone dropped running that same software.

Looking Forwards

Sure there are things in the works to improve the user’s experience like Fuschia, but that doesn’t mean that Android is on its way out.  The fact of the matter is Android is going nowhere.  An operating system that covers 75% of smartphones worldwide is too nested into Google’s overarching architecture to instantly remove, and there are too many new Android advancements coming out to argue that Google wants to remove it.

What do you think about the recent talk against Android?  Let us know your predictions in the comments below!

 

The Pixel 3 has been unveiled, and it looks sweet!

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The Pixel 3 has been unveiled, and it looks sweet!

We’ve talked about the Pixel 3 again and again here at RootJunky, and there have been far too many rumors and leaks about it over the past few months.  I’m happy to say that’s all come to a close.  Not because I don’t like writing about it, but because the Pixel 3 has officially been released. Earlier today Google unveiled the new phone, and the preorders have begun rolling in.

The Hype Recap:

Before we get in to what the Pixel 3 and 3XL actually are, let’s take a second to remember how much build up there was about these devices.  There were images leaked on the XDADeveloper forum showing a notched display with two cameras, as well as a glass back for wireless charging.  But hardware leaks aside, what was really interesting about this phone’s build up was the rumors about rumors.

After we’d all sat with the leaked images for a bit the news surfaces that Google was reaching out to popular YouTuber’s asking to use their clips bashing the leaked design.  The result of this was the people began thinking Google had intentionally leaked images so that they could use this footage in their grand reveal of a more impressive phone.  It was a conspiracy theory for sure, but not entirely unbelievable.

Fast-forward to October 9th’s Hardware:

Skipping to today the Pixel actually dropped, and it actually doesn’t look that different from the leaked images.  Despite what some YouTuber’s may have said I don’t think that’s a bad thing.  Starting at $799, the Pixel 3 sticks to the traditional design of a split material back allowing for wireless charging (thank goodness!).  The regular phone measures in at 5.5 inches and for $100 more the XL measures in at 6.3 inches.

Pixel phones have been notorious for having great cameras, and that trend isn’t stopping with the Pixel 3. It is however deciding to avoid the current trend of a dual rear camera.  With a total of 3 cameras, one can be found on the back and two on the front.  And guess what?  For the XL these cameras are nested in a notch.  This trend seems to be sticking around for a while, and even Google’s flagship device has embraced it.  The new cameras seek to take the crown and offer incredible zoom in as well as a wide range selfie mode.

Screening the Spammers:

Remember that ground breaking release from Google I/O earlier this year called Duplex?  It seemed unreal as the Google Assistant called a barber shop, had a conversation with the receptionist, and successfully booked an appointment for its user.
Well the Pixel 3 leverages this technology to make your call screening much more enjoyable.  Using Duplex, you’ll never have to answer the phone for a telemarketer again.

The Pixel 3 can answer itself and provide a real-time transcript to you of whatever the caller says. Duplex prompts them on the other side of the line asking them to identify themselves and let you know if the call is urgent, and as they talk you can see the text appear on your screen.
Then if you want to answer you can, or you can select from premade responses to keep the conversation going and get more details before deciding to pick up or not.  Google Assistant really is becoming a personal secretary.

I’m really excited for the Pixel 3 to be out and will be getting my hands on it as soon as I can. What are your thoughts on the new device?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Minus And Project Strobe

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Google Minus and Project Strobe

After 7 years of effort Google has decided that enough is enough for Google+.  The tech giant has admitted to failing its entrance into the social media marketplace. As both a business decision and safety concern they’ve decided to take Google+ off the web and focus on other things.

Project Strobe

Security has been at the forefront of everyone’s minds this year as privacy scandal after privacy scandal has surfaced.  Facebook’s Cambridge Analytics scandal made us hyper aware of how much data is exposed to third-parties.  In an attempt to combat privacy issues Google launched Project Strobe.  It’s a root-and-branch review of third-party developer access to Google accounts and Android devices.  Essentially it’s a research project to check up on how secure everyone’s information really is.

The findings: not the best.   Today Google announced four key findings from the project along with steps to remedy each.

1. There are significant challenges in creating and maintain a successful Google+ product that meets consumer’s expectations.

Google+ has a pretty serious bug in it that exposed user data to third-party applications that didn’t have proper access.  Google says that there is no evidence anyone else found this out before they did (hard to be sure).  But combining this with the lack of adoption among users and the end result has been to remove Google+ entirely.  I don’t think anyone is too upset at this move, and it’s probably for the best Google diverts its time towards new innovations.

2. People want fine-grained controls over the data they share with apps

When you download a new app that performs certain functions, it may need permission to do so.  Whether that’s accessing your camera to take a picture or seeing your contacts so that it can share a picture with others, apps can’t do these things until you let them.  This is a big plus for Android security, but unfortunately sometimes it’s not organized well enough.

There are some permissions that are grouped together when presented to a user, and this can potentially be a problem.  If you want an app to do one thing you shouldn’t have to grant it access to 3 permission, yet this is sometimes how things are organized.  Google has announced they’ll be launching more granular account permissions that will show individual dialog boxes for each.  Maybe a little more frustrating for relaxed users, but definitely a win for security.

3. When users grant apps access to their Gmail, they do so with certain user cases in mind

To correct the security issue of third-parties abusing contact information Google is limiting what kinds of apps are allowed to access Gmail data.  The only apps allowed will be those that are “directly enhancing email functionality”.  Basically, if there’s not real reason for your app to need to write an email, it’s banned.

4. When users grant SMS, Contacts and Phone permissions to Android apps they do so with certain use cases in mind.

3 and 4 are pretty similar to one another, but this other finding takes things past email and into the phone/contacts.  Google is limiting how many apps will be allowed to access this information.  In addition to this Contact interaction data will no longer be available vie the Android Contacts API.

The bottom line is that Google did a security sweep and decided a few things needed to change.  It seems that these changes are proactive which is always a good things, but if you’re one of the world’s Google+ user’s then I’m sorry you have to say goodbye.  For everyone else these changes should be nothing but good as security continues to improve.

What are your thoughts on Project Strobe?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

Let Firebase Cover the Basics For You

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Let Firebase Cover the Basics For You

When it comes to writing code, the less you have to do the better.  You want control over how your applications behave, but if you can piggy back off of other developer’s work then that’s generally a good thing.  And if you’re hoping to be an app developer, then one of the best tools for piggy backing is Firebase.

Using others to your advantage:

If you think about it even developing the most basic app takes the work of countless others.  Someone else had to develop the programming language you’re writing in, someone else had to build the IDE (probable Android Studio) that you’re developing on, and someone had to…well you get the point.  Any modern-day invention was not created from nothing, it came about thanks to the ground work being done by something that came first.

This doesn’t mean you can’t be innovative.  It means that there’s nothing wrong with using 3rd party libraries and tools to make your development journey easier.  If you don’t have to worry about the basics then you can focus on what makes your app great.  Ok enough justification, let’s talk about how you should use Firebase to make life easier.

Authentication and Data Management:

How many apps do you have that require you to sign in to fully use features?  Of those how many let you create and account through Facebook?  Users hate having to create sign-in info, a decent percentage won’t even go through the process because of the extra 10 seconds it takes.  So including an option for one-click sign in makes it more likely your app will succeed from the start.  Firebase makes this feature easy to leverage allowing you to create a sign in screen with companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google. 

When users sign up Firebase keeps track of their info and allows user management to be easily configured.  If a user gets a new phone they can log in and Firebase will associate them with the same account.  Firebase also has a database feature allowing you to create and store JSON info, so users can interact with one another and store information easily.  Let’s say you wanted to create that new social media app which lets people post pictures and message one another:  Firebase should be your go to.

Analytics:

When you release an app it’s best to have a game plan for what’s next.  What if users love one part of the app but never use another?  Well if that’s the case then you should aim for a redesign that either brings in new features or directs the users attention to things they are more interested in.  Of course if you release an app and people in other countries start downloading it you can’t exactly track them down and ask them how they’ve been using the app.

This is where analytics come in.  Firebase gives you the capability to monitor user events (anonymously) so you can see which features are getting the most interaction.  If you have a search bar in your app that no one ever clicks on, it’s either time to drop it or move it elsewhere to try again.  Analytics can keep you in know for how your app is behaving and what should change.

Crashlytics:

And on the topic of what should change in app behavior, crashes are about the worst thing a user can experience.  You may be getting 1 star ratings in the app store because your app shuts off randomly for some users and you don’t know why.  Firebase offers Crashlytics to look at the stack trace details for every crashed application.  If there’s one button in your app that is broken and slipped through your checks when publishing, now you’ll be able to see that it’s responsible for the crashes and act accordingly.

Firebase offers a ton of other features that can make development easier and the user experience more fluid.  These are just the tip of the iceberg and features I enjoy using on a daily basis.  If you want to learn how to incorporate Firebase into your apps then checkout Phonlab’s Android Development Course!

 

That Missing Guide To Kotlin Part 2

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That Missing Guide To Kotlin Part 2

In part one of our Kotlin series we began exploring the newly adopted language.  We saw a few examples of how it can make our code more concise and user friendly than Java including type inference and inline constructors.  In part two we’ll continue to show how Kotlin can make your code easier to work with while focusing on one dreaded Java roadblock: The NullPointerException.

If you’ve written anything in Java before then you’re familiar with NPE’s.  It occurs when you attempt to interact with a variable’s value, but it turns out there is no value to interact with.  Your compiler can’t see that there’s no value available, but at run-time your system checks for it and then crashes when it can’t be found.

Kotlin to the rescue

While Kotlin is 100% interoperable with Java (99% really as we’ll see soon) it’s fundamentally different in a few aspects.  One of these is nullability.  In Java every variable has a default value.  This is the value it can fall back on if you never explicity say what value it contained.  For example when you declare a boolean variable, unless you specify its value, it will be false.  For any variable that isn’t a primitive type, the default value will be null.  This can be really useful at times, but it allows us to accidentally try to grab a value when there isn’t one.

In Kotlin its possible to completely avoid this situation. Every variable that is declared is either a nullable type or a non-null type.  What this means is that along with declaring what type of value (Int, Boolean, custom class) your variable holds, you declare whether it is ever allowed to be null or not.  Here are two varaibles declared in Kotlin.  The first can never be null, while the second is nullable.

As you can see, the question mark is used to show a variable has the possibility of being null.  If there’s no question mark in the variables declaration, then you are safe to use it in every situation without risking it throwing an NPE.  This means that you’ll never have to write if statements checking if a variable is null to play things safe. Goodbye useless lines of code

Nullablility In Action

When using non-null type variables, we don’t have to check if there is a value present.  But for other situations we still must take precautions.  One way that Kotlin allows us to do this concisely is through safe calls.  A safe call looks similar to the traditional method of retrieving a value, except we include a question mark at the end of the variable.  So

Becomes

By doing this we can almost read the code as if it’s English.  We’re asking “does the pet exist?”, and if the answer to that question is yes then we move on to the name characteristic of our pet.  If there is no pet that has been created at this point in our code, instead of the app crashing our variable will be given a value of null.

This becomes incredibly powerful when we start chaining safe calls.  Let’s say we want to check if a company has an HR department with an employee name Toby who at tuna for lunch.  Instead of writing a null check for each of these before interacting with them we can write

If along the way any of these things doesn’t exist, then the code will finish the statement returning null and not interacting with any of the variables past the break.  Without an HR department the code won’t crash, but instead our employee variable will be set equal to null.

Control Is A Good Thing

This is probably the most common feature of Kotlin that you see people talk about, and it’s because of how powerful it is.  Not having to deal with null values is amazing, but even when we have to our code can be concise and clean.

The language can also smart cast nullable variables into non-null given the proper verification at first.  So if you had a nullable variable and then explicitly check if it wasn’t null, then you wouldn’t need to use any ?’s moving forward when accessing that variable.

Kotlin isn’t perfect, but when it comes to dealing with null values it has everything that Java has to offer with some additional perks and changes.  We’ll continue exploring some of Kotlin’s advantages in part 3.  In the mean time if you have any questions about how nullability works let us know in the comments below!

Rumors About Rumors About the Pixel 3

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Rumors About Rumors About the Pixel 3

Over the past few months rumors have been floating around left and right about the upcoming Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL.  We’ve written about leaks here before as a serious of photos have surfaced revelaing potential designs.  Of particular interest are the XL leaks with the notch taking phone manufacturers by storm these days.  These are so interesting not because of what they show, but what they may be hiding.

The newest rumor going around is that the Pixel 3 XL we’ve seen thus far is a fake.  And not simply fake that someone decided to make up, but rather a fake that was released by Google to throw people off.  It’s a bold claim, but not entirely impossible.  Here’s why:

Hating The Notch:

When the XL leaks first surfaced a lot of people got excited.  And likewise a lot of people were upset to see that the notch was involved.  The 3 is set to bring back other exciting features like wireless charging, yet the notch seems to be what gained so much attention.  Some well known YouTubers have critiqued the design on their channels.  Google has taken note.

According to Jon Prosser, one of the YouTubers who spoke out against the leak, Google reached out to him and asked for a very specific clip of him speaking badly about the design.  He found out from other YouTubers that the same request was made to quite a few of them.  Google didn’t say why it wanted the footage, but simply asked for it.

What’s Google’s Game?

So why would Google want to use footage from well known reviewers bashing its product?  Well, the natural conclusion is that it’s not really their product.  If people hate the design that’s been leaked and it turns out that’s not actually the desing Google is unveiling in October, then no harm no foul.  Actually if anything it could help Google as they market that they’ve listened to people’s feedback and are moving in a direction that consumers want.

It’s possible (but not confirmed) that Google has artificially leaked things in an attempt to generate a buzz about the new phones.  If that’s the case then it’s definitely worked.  As to the probability of this actually ocurring…well that’s another story.  Only time will tell, but you could argue it’s pretty farfetched.  It would be incredibly hard to keep this kind of fake leak in house up until now.

Pie and The Notch

The Pixel 3 will also be the first phone to come with Android Pie which includes notch support.  The two don’t have to come in a package deal, but it would be a little strange to see that as a feature in Pie and not have it avaiable to users who buy the first phone with it.

What do you think of these rumors about rumors?  Whether you think its plausible or ridiculous let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Monetizing Your Apps With Ads

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Monetizing Your Apps With Ads

App making is a beautiful things.  You can literally write down what you want to happen, and watch your creations come to life.  It’s both a science and an art.  Unfortunately sometimes app making alone doesn’t pay the bills.  It does if you work for a company or you freelance your skills to other people, but if you want to make apps on your own, you need to find a way to cover your costs.  Enter ads.

Of course, no one likes ads.  They’re an evil necessity though, allowing goods and services that would otherwise cost money to be enjoyed for free. The user gets a free experience, the company displaying ads gets publicity, and you the developer get money! It’s not a get rich quick scheme, but trust me, you’re going to get downloads a lot quicker if you can make your app free.

Who do I need to call?

Before you pick up the phone and start calling local companies to see if they want a spot in your app you should know its easier than you think. Rather than having to contract with advertisers yourself, Google does the heavy lifting.  AdMob is a mobile advertising company designed to link developer’s creations with companies looking to advertise.  All you the developer have to do is add a spot in your app for ads to appear, and Google takes care of the rest.

It doesn’t matter how they do it or what steps are involved, but Google will gather and distribute the advertisements companies have paid them for.  You may be advertising for Coca-Cola, or Tide.  You don’t really know and you probably don’t care.  Meanwhile every time an ad is displayed to a user and then clicked on you earn a couple pennies.  Not enough? Well get a few thousand downloads and then we’ll see how your bank account is doing.

How to get started?

A lot of job descriptions I’ve seen include “experience with AdMob” as if it’s something that takes a while to master.  This couldn’t be farther from the truth.  There are a few steps to get things set up initially, but the process isn’t complicated.  We walk you through creating an account, adding the necessary code, and publishing your app at on the Play Store.

Here’s AdMob’s website where you can create an account. Once you do that the two things you’ll need to do are update your xml to include a view for your ads, and then create a new AdRequest to load your ads.

One Size Fits All?

There are actually different kinds of ads that you can include in your app.  The instructions above are for Banner ads.  These are small ads that appear either at the top or bottom of the users screen while they are using the app.  User’s may not even notice them if you use them correctly.  Then there are other ads such as Interstitial ads.  These are much more invasive taking up the user’s entire screen for a short time.  User’s really don’t like these, so make sure you use them wisely (maybe in between levels in a game).

The bottom line is that ads can be really beneficial to you as the developer, and if done correctly hardly an inconvenience to users.  It’s a win-win.  We didn’t go into the weeds on anything here, but if there’s something else you want to know about ads or AdMob, just let us know in the comments below!

 

Android Pie is Fresh Out Of The Oven

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Android Pie is Fresh Out Of The Oven

Today Google officially dubbed the newest version of the Android operating system as Pie!  Along with this naming they’ve also released the first official version of it to Pixel phones.  Android users around the world are debating whether this was the right dessert name or not, but either way we know that Pie has some great things in store for us.

The Build Up:

Over the past few months we’ve seen a few beta version of Pie released on a series of smartphones, but this official release is only available on Pixel phones.  People who signed up for the Android Beta program will receive the update by the end of this fall though.  Google also said it’s working to launch/upgrade other devices sometime this year.

Those details are pretty vague, and if Pie behaves anything like other Android versions, it could be over a year before it’s adoption rate breaks double digit percentages.  All the same it’s officially available to Pixel users and it has a name.  That’s plenty for now, but let’s also not forget that Pie is available in its beta format on a number of different devices.

A review of Pie:

We’ve talked about Pie and its cool new features a few times here at RootJunky.com.  The new software is designed with predictive analytics and AI for battery power as some of the main features.  The idea is to improve things behind the scene for users.  Pie monitors and adjusts screen brightness as well as what apps are in the background during different times of the day.  It gets used to user’s habits, and then preps itself in advance to recreate that behavior.  AI is definitely a buzz-word, but that doesn’t mean it can’t have some perks.

It also features an official dark mode option in settings, something Android user’s have been asking for for years.  Notifications also offer features such as smart replies for texting and a new feel to them, so the changes in this version are both front and back end.

Aaand the Notch:

Of course when we’re talking about new looks we have to mention the notch.  It’s taken a hold of both the iOS and Android markets so much that Google has actually come out and banned phones with more than 3 notches from getting Google support.  Somewhat crazy to even think more than 3 notches could exist on a phone right now, but you never know!

One more feature that I have to mention that I’m very excited for is the change to rotation.  Instead of just locking your rotation or having it rotate every time you accidentally turn your screen, you now have optional re-orientation.  Android Pie will display a small button when it detects a screen rotation, and if you select this then the phone knows to readjust, and if not then you can continue doing things as you were, undisturbed.

The Pixel 3 will be coming out on October 4th just a few months from now, and it will likely be the first phone to be released with Pie as it’s initial operating system, but Pie is now available to those who are willing to take the steps to get it.  I’m excited to see it grow this year, and I’m also very interested to see what Q is going to be named.

What are your thoughts on Pie’s name?  Could Google have done better?  And if so, do you think it’s new features will make up for it? Let us know in the comments below.

 

Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

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Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

Android is the world’s most popular mobile operating system, and for good reason.  It’s created both high end and affordable options for users worldwide to experience what it has to offer.  And what is has to offer has been time and time again improved upon.  That being said, improvements are always happening in the tech world, and 5 years from now Android might not hold it’s place as #1.  Here’s a curve ball for you: I’m not talking about Apple.  Android’s upcoming replacement may be Fuchsia.

Wait…what the heck is Fuchsia?

For a few years now a stealthy group on engineers at Google have been working on Fuchsia.  The project came into existence as a potential solution to Android’s limitations.  It’s being designed with voice interactions and security updates in mind where the current Android platform falls short.  And while this has been quiet, it hasn’t been locked down.  Some of the code has been open source since 2016 and outside app developers have been allowed to experiment with it.

The Fuchsia team has a higher goal than just more efficient software though.  They’re attempting to design something that will make interaction with all in-house gadgets a fluid experience.  Imagine a single operating system that controls all your speakers, tv, and other residential tech.  Now imagine also being able to interact with all of these devices by speaking to them.  Your house becomes a sentient being, somewhat like this post we wrote a few months back.

So Android will be gone in 5 years?

No, I definitely exaggerated in that first paragraph.  5 years would be an insanely quick turnaround for Android to completely fall off the map.  Android currently dominates as king with roughly 75% market share compared to Apple’s 15%.  Still, it’s far from perfect.  There are performance, privacy, and security concerns with out of date Android phones that need to be addressed, and a new software like Fuchsia could help jump that transition forward.  All the same we’ll be seeing Android phones for quite some time still, and P hasn’t even reached the market!

Fuschia is being developed with audio interactions at its core.  There haven’t been any apps built on it at a serious commercial level yet, but rumors are flying that we’ll be seeing a YouTube app with voice command soon.  My prediction is that over the next year or two Fuchsia is going to grow in the open source community until its eventual official launch, at which point we’re going to see a boom (hopefully a quicker boom than new Android version adoption rates!).  I’ll be keeping a close eye on it, so stay tuned for more updates.  And if you have any thoughts about Fuchsia or it’s potential let us know here!

 

Android P Releases Its Final Beta

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Android P Releases Its Final Beta

While Android Oreo is just starting to hit its stride, Android P is making news too.  This week Google released the final beta preview of Android P before it’s official launch.  We’ve seen a few beta previews so far this year, and this one should be even closer to what P will look like when it launches.

According to Android VP Dave Burke this beta includes “final system behaviors” meaning Google’s new gesture-based navigation will be locked in and shipping with Android 9.0.  Of course there’s always room for improvement, and that’s a large reason betas exist, but this should be stable for installation on your main phone.  Google hasn’t mentioned any known bugs, so if you have a phone that can handle it out get the beta and let us know what you think!

What’s new in P?

We’ve talked before about Android P and what features it has to offer.  Spoiler: they’re awesome.  P offers a series of features that revolve around the idea of predictive analytics.

There’s an adaptive battery that takes into account what time of day you typically are running your apps, and if it doesn’t think you’ll be using them any time soon it shuts them off to save energy.  Couple this with the screen brightness which auto adjusts based on what you typically set it to throughout the day, and you’re looking at a much longer lasting battery life.

Apart from performance improvements, we also have completely new features that enable us to experience things differently.  One I’ve talked about before at length is Wi-Fi RTT.  Round Trip Time is a method of really getting to know your exact current location.  It’s accurate within about a meter, and does so by triangulating between multiple Wi-Fi access points nearby.  This improved location methodology offers some cool opportunities that just depend on how creative developers want to get.

Privacy Improvements:

There are also security improvements that come with P, and in an everchanging world of privacy that’s a key improvement.  Have you ever gotten a notification saying an app was running in the background when you didn’t think you’d been using it?  How about having an app crash in the background even though you haven’t opened it in ages?  That’s never a good thing to see.  P will prevent idle apps from performing actions such as accessing your camera (yes this is a thing!!).  P offers a series of security upgrades that limit what apps can do in the background in an effort to help protect user privacy.

How to get P?

First off, I’m so ready to stop calling it P and use it’s actual name. Unfortunately we’ll have to wait a little longer for that.  But if you want to get the beta on your phone today you can check it out on Android’s developer website here.  Give it a try and let us know your thoughts on it!  We’ll be sure to continue writing about developments in the software, so stay tuned for more.