Building Your First Augmented Reality App Pt. 2

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Building Your First Augmented Reality App Pt. 2

Welcome to part two of this Augmented Reality tutorial.  Now that we’re done with the boring set-up process, we’re ready to dive into Unity and see a final product!

As a quick review, in part 1 you created a Vuforia account and a license key.  Then on Vuforia’s website you created a database to hold your image target (the dollar bill) and downloaded that along with our 3D elephant.  Finally you downloaded/opened Unity (our game editor) and changed the build settings to Android.  Ok, now let’s continue from there:

Setting our Package Name:

Remember how last time we opened “Player Settings” and then the tab that said “XR Settings”?  Well there are a few more small things we’ll have to do in this section.  Instead of “XR Settings” open up the “Other Settings” tab.  Every app that is published on the Google Play Store needs a unique ID so that it doesn’t get mixed up with other apps.  So while you may see two apps with the same name, under the hood their ID’s are different.  This ID is known as the app’s package name.

In our “Other Settings” tab we’ll write what we want our package name to be.  This can be whatever you want, but I’ll use “com.rootjunky.vuforiaelephant”.  Now my app has an ID and Unity will be able to run it on any mobile phone.  Also go ahead and uncheck the box “Android TV Compatibility”, since this app won’t work on Android TVs.

Now to import all of our materials from the first post.  In your Unity project you should see a section for the Project hierarchy.  This shows all the files/resources in the project, and we’ll be storing everything inside the folder named Assets.  We already have our Vuforia files in here, and to get everything else into this folder you can click and drag the following into the Assets folder:

  1. The Vuforia database you downloaded
  2. The 3D elephant model

Creating the Scene:

Once all of these assets are together we can begin messing with our scene.  Go to “file” then “Save Scene”, and save this scene as main (we can think of scenes as different parts of our game, but we only need one for this project).    Now inside of our scene’s hierarchy right click on the Main Camera and delete it.  Then click “Create” -> “Vuforia” -> “AR Camera”.  This will add Vuforia’s custom camera to our scene that takes care of all image targeting (i.e. recognizing dollar bills).

But now that we have the AR camera, we still need to tell it to look for a dollar bill, and to place an elephant on top of that dollar bill once we find it.  To do this select “Create” -> “Vuforia” -> “Camera Image” -> “Camera Image Target”.  If you click on an object in the scene the right-side tab will show details about it, and selecting the Image Target will display a detail section titles “Image Target Behavior”.  In here set Type to “Predefined”, Database to “DollarElephant”, and Image Target to “dollarTarget” (see the following image).

Setting these values connects our database to the image target, so now our camera knows to look for a dollar bill.  But in order to use Vuforia we also need to add our license key.  Make sure you have this still copied to your clipboard, and then selected the AR Camera in the scene.  One of the details you’ll see appear for it is labeled “Vuforia Behaviour”,  In here click the Open Vuforia configuration button and then paste in your App License Key.  Then in the Databases dropdown check the boxes that say “Load DollarElephant Data” and “Activate”.

Displaying The Elephant:

Now for the final step: attaching our elephant.  Find the elephant model inside of your Assets folder (most likely named “source” right now).  Click and drag this little guy onto your ImageTarget in the Hierarchy tab.  This will make the elephant become a “child” of the ImageTarget.

Chances are things look funky though on your screen, and this is because the elephant model is HUGE.  Inside of its Inspector tab we can change its position, rotation, and scale, so lets drop its x, y, and z values for scale down to 0.1.  Then set the position to 0 for the x and z axis, and 0.5 for the y axis (this just raises the elephant a bit so he’s on top of the dollar).

And that’s it!  We’ve attached our Vuforia files to the scene and bound a 3D model to Vuforia’s image target.  With just a few steps we’re now ready to see our augmented reality creation come to life. Connect your phone to your computer (make sure it’s USB Debuggable) and then go to File -> Build Settings again.  Select “Build and Run”, and your game will download onto the connected device.

When the app is up and running point it at any dollar bill, and you’ll see a virtual elephant appear on top.  What’s even cooler is that if you pick up the dollar and move it around the elephant will stay on top.

Congratulations on sticking through this whole process.  It’s very possible you got stuck along the way, and if that’s the case just comment below and I’ll try to help you out.  And if you’re interested in learning more about Android development then you can always check out Phonlab’s course HERE.

Building Your First Augmented Reality App

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We’ve talked before about how influential augmented reality is going to be in the future.  What we didn’t mention is how easy it can be to take part in shaping that future.  Over the course of the next two posts we’ll show how to incorporate AR into an app, and when it’s all said and done we’ll be able to look at a virtual elephant in the real world.

It’s not too complicated as far as subject material goes, but there a couple steps involved so we’ll split this into two pieces: gathering our resources and then putting them into action.

Before we do any work though, let’s take a second to discuss the bigger picture of what we’ll be doing here.  If you’ve ever experimented with game development, then you’ve probably heard of Unity.  If not, then some things in this tutorial may seem a little confusing at first (but far from impossible!).  Unity is a development environment where developers can make 2D and 3D games, and we’ll be using it here to host our augmented reality app.  Click here to download Unity, and when you do make sure that you include the Android/iOS and Vuforia plugins.

We all know about Android and iOS, but odds are Vuforia is a new name.  Vuforia is a popular AR platform that allows us to use image targeting in our apps.  Essentially all we have to do is pick a 3D model and an image.  Vuforia will then root our 3D model to any images it sees in the real world.

For example, in this app we’ll be using a 3D model of an elephant made with Blender, and the image will be a $1 bill.  With this combination, any time our app’s camera finds a dollar bill in the real world, it will place the 3D model on top of it.  The result is the title image of this post.

Ok, that’s enough background.  Let’s jump into the actual set up.  Use the above link to download Unity if you don’t already have it, and then go to developer.Vuforia.com and create an account.  After you’ve made an account click on the develop tab and then click to create a new license key.  You can name this anything you want, but as you can see in this image I chose “VuforiaElephant” as my name.

After creating the license key you’ll be able to click on it and see a string of random characters representing it.  Copy and paste this value; we’ll be using it later in this tutorial. 

We create this license key so that our app in Unity will be able to connect to our Vuforia account.  Now for the second step we’ll need to do create a database inside of Vuforia to hold our dollar bill image.  Change your selection from License Manager to Target Manager and then add a new database.  I’ve named mine “DollarElephant”.  Inside of this database we’ll click “Add Target” to add a new target.  Pull any image of a dollar bill from Google images and add it here.  Then set it’s width value to 5 and give it a name (dollarTarget is just fine).

When you’re done with this click to download the database, and that’s everything we’ll need to do in Vuforia.  Before moving into Unity let’s also get the 3D model of an elephant we want to use.  Click here to download the elephant made by sagarkalbande (and feel free to try this out with a different model).  Save this file onto your computer and now let’s move into Unity.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed right now, don’t worry we’re not going to do much else in this first part.  For now let’s open Unity and create a new project named “VuforiaElephant”.  Go to “File”, then “Build Settings” and select Android as your Platform.  After making this change the little Unity cube should appear next to Android.

Finally inside of the Build Settings window click on “Player Settings” and a bar of options will appear on the right side of your screen showing setting options.  Open the tab that says “XR Settings” and check the box that adds Vuforia Augmented Reality to our project.  Go ahead and import the settings that Unity says it needs to add, and now we’re ready to start the fun stuff.

If you’ve made it this far down the blog, then good work sticking through the dry steps.  We created a Vuforia account, made a license key, and selected a dollar bill as our image target.  Then we downloaded our elephant 3D model and created a new project in Unity.

So now we just have to make the connection inside of our Unity app between the dollar and the elephant.  Stay tuned for the second part of this tutorial in the next few days and we’ll finish out the project so that everyone can have their own virtual elephant! Does app development have you completely lost? Check out Phonlab Android app development classes HERE

Android Adding Animated App Ads

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Android Adding Animated App Ads

Whether you like them or not, ads are here to stay.  They’re the reason so many apps are free to us as consumers, and without them we’d have to pay a few more valuable dollars out of pocket.  That being said, the less of a nuisance an ad is the better.  Google is exploring how to make ads more interesting, and the results are pretty meta.

Google’s New Strategy:

Google is testing out two new forms of advertisements, and while they’re in beta testing right now, it’s just a matter of time before they’re rolled out to everyone.  The first of these are video ads in the Play Store’s search results.  These videos won’t autoplay, but upon searching for a game users will have to option to watch trailers for related games.  Not too complicated of an idea, but certainly more interesting than just seeing 4 screenshots of what gameplay entails.

Now the really interesting change that Google is exploring is how to interrupt user’s experiences with ads without them realizing they’ve been interrupted.  The solution?  Games within games.  Usually when you complete a level or die in an app game you’re confronted with a short video of the newest game on the Play Store.  If you’re anything like me you count down the seconds until you can click to skip and get back to what you were doing before.  Google plans to make this experience less of a hassle by creating playable ads.  So when your game/app is interrupted by an ad, that ad will actually be a mini game that can be played.

The hope behind this is to get users more involved and increase the click rate on advertisements, all the while exposing players to games of similar styles and genres.  According to Google, video ads are used in almost half of the 1,000 top-earning apps.  A big change like this is certain to get some exposure.

Impending Impact:

It’s possible that these ads have an adverse effect and cause games to become more burdened with advertisements, but I for one have a bright outlook on this new implementation.  If this change is done in a tactful way that replaces current ads rather than adding on to them, things should be fine.

And from a developer’s standpoint, this change should be welcome.  I think It’s important to emphasize that an app only has to have as many ads as its creators choose it to.  Developers can learn how to easily integrate AdMob into their apps, and then decide how apparent they want ads to be in their app.  There’s a fine line to walk between scaring away users with too many ads and bringing in revenues, so regardless of any changes that come a free market should balance this trade off out.

How do you feel about Google mixing things up in its advertising department?  Let us know in the comments below.

Learn How To Develop Android Apps

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Coding is like printing your own money!!! 

Everyone has that one app idea that’s sure to be the next big thing, yet so many of these possibilities slip away unnoticed by the world.  The problem isn’t coming up with the idea, it’s crafting it into a tangible app people can download and share.   If you’ve been itching to turn an idea into reality and show the world what it’s been missing, then you’re in luck.

Phonlab’s newest course has officially been released, and to say we’re excited is an understatement.  The Android App Development course is designed to guide a student all the way from writing their first line of code ever to publishing apps on the Google Play Store.  We’ve built it to cover all the basics of Android while throwing in some snazzy features to make your creations more exciting for users.  By the end of the course you’ll not only be set up with the resources need to make a million-dollar app, but you’ll already have a portfolio of 5 apps to show off to family, friends, and potential employers.  

Here’s a quick rundown of the apps you’ll be building:

  1.  ScoreKeeper:  After learning about the basics of Java and XML this multi-sport score keeping app will show students how to build complex layouts.  Here we’ll make the jump to multiscreen apps with complex interactive layouts.  
  2.  SoundScape:  For app #2 students will learn how to include audio into their apps by building a soundboard with their own personal touches.  Audio’s not always a necessity in apps, but learning to include it can create a more immersive experience and really make your app pop.
  3.  NewsNet: In this app students will learn about this beautiful thing called the web and begin streaming live data into their apps.  We’ll consolidate articles from over 5,000 news sources into just one screen and learn some tricks the pros use to speed up development.
  4.  MyReads: Have you ever wanted to keep a log of every book you’ve ever read?  Well if so (and if not) app #4 of the course is centered around building a database for this very purpose.  We’ll learn about SQL, one of the most important languages in the data world, and learn how to share info between apps.
  5.  FireChat: In our 5th app students will build a group messaging app complete with social media incorporation by learning the syntax behind Android’s newest language Kotlin.  Kotlin has a bright future ahead of it, but online learning resources are currently few and far (Phonlab to the rescue!)

These apps are the bedrock of the education, but of course we want to set you up for success, so there are lots of other topics covered along the way.  These include how to use Github to build projects with a team of developers, and diving into the depths of object oriented programming.

Whether you want to learn as a (lucrative) career choice, or as a side hobby, there’s no better time to begin your journey, and we want to be by your side all the way.

Enroll Now At Phonlab

ChromeBook Recovery Hacks and Tricks

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A Chromebook can be a great purchase even if you never step outside of Google’s trusted environment. They are some of the best web machines ever built, require almost no software maintenance, and come in a myriad of different styles and price points. Now that the latest models also come with Google Play Store and support thousands of apps where are some amazing devices.

But like anything electronic, sometimes it’s fun to push the envelope and do things a little outside of the intended use. Sometimes that means hidden features in the software, sometimes it means altering the software, and sometimes it means replacing the software entirely. We’re familiar with people doing just that with Android, but it’s also pretty easy to do with your Chromebook. The best part is that it’s also very easy to go back.

Create a Chromebook recovery image

Before you start doing anything it’s always a good idea to have a path back to a time when everything worked. Luckily, that’s fairly easy when we’re talking about a Chromebook. Google has an official tool that will install the factory-issued software to your Chrome device on a 4GB or larger USB stick or SD card. You can then use this media to restore your Chromebook just like it was fresh out of the box. Thanks Google.

Directions

 

Step 1: Install the Chromebook Recovery Utility app

  1. On the working computer (Windows, Mac, or Linux) and (not the Chromebook with the error), install the recovery app.
  2. Open the app.

  1. In the screen that appears, type in the model number of the Chromebook you want to recover. Note While in recovery your device will display the model see picture below for details.
    You can find this number at the bottom of the error message on your Chromebook.
  2. Click Continue.

Important: All the information on the USB drive or SD card will be deleted. Make sure you’ve backed up those files.

  1. On the working computer, insert your USB drive or SD card into an open port. The recovery app will show all storage devices connected to your computer.
  2. Use the dropdown menu in the app to select the correct storage device.
  3. Click Continue.

To create a recovery image:

  1. Click Create now.
  2. The tool will create the recovery image on your USB drive or SD card. Don’t remove the storage device yet.
  3. When you see a message saying that your recovery media is ready, remove the storage device from your computer.

Open the Chromebook you want to recover.

If you have anything connected to this Chromebook (such as a mouse, SD card, or external hard drive), remove it.

Enter recovery mode:

  • On a Chromebook: Press and hold Esc + Refresh Refresh, then press Power Power. Let go of Power. When a message shows on the screen, let go of the other keys.
  • On a Chromebox: Turn it off. Using a paper clip or similar object, press and hold the recovery button. Press the Power button to turn the Chromebox back on. When you see a message on screen, release the recovery button.
  • On a Chromebit: Unplug it from power. Using a paper clip or similar object, press and hold the recovery button. Plug the Chromebit back in to power. When you see a message on screen, release the recovery button.

You’ll see one of these messages:

  • “Chrome OS is missing or damaged. Please insert a recovery USB stick or SD card.”
  • “Please insert a recovery USB stick or SD card.”

Insert the recovery media you’ve created (SD card or USB drive).

Follow the on-screen instructions.

Reboot and enjoy your factory-fresh software!

STOP WRITE HERE AND CREATE THE RECOVERY IMAGE NOW BEFORE CONTINUING.  

If you are still having problems check out this info HERE

Change to the beta or dev channel

This is really simple and something I recommend. By default, your Chromebook runs on the stable release channel for your model. This means everything has been tested, things run pretty smoothly, and there usually aren’t any critical bugs to trip you up.

That’s absolutely no fun.

The good news is that we all can be testers by switching the software channel in the settings. Click the Chrome OS wrench icon in the lower right and open the settings. Choose About Chrome OS > More Info. Click the Change Channel button and choose between Stable, Beta and Dev – Unstable channels in the popover window that appears.

 

Both the beta and the dev channel give you access to upcoming (both default and experimental settings — see below) features that aren’t in the stable channel just yet. I’ve always found the beta channel to work pretty well, but expect issues and glitches on the dev channel along with the latest features.

If you just want everything to work, switching back to the stable channel is just as easy — choose it from the same list!

Tweaking the settings

Chrome — both the operating system and the stand alone browser for Windows Mac and Linux — has an entire page filled with “experimental” settings. Some will absolutely break things, others might improve your experience. Find them is simple.

Fire up the browser and enter chrome://flags into the Omnibox (a fancy name for the URL bar in Chrome) then hit enter.

You’ll be faced with a huge list of features that you can enable or disable at will. All of them are experimental, some are serious security holes, others are potential oh-crap-I-need-to-reload-EVERYTHING bringers of doom. We don’t recommend you just jump in and start enabling things. Instead, talk to people who are using the same model of Chromebook that you are and find out what works and what doesn’t.

It’s also worth remembering that these experimental flags can disappear at any time. Some may be merged into the OS, others will just up and disappear. If you do enable something, lets say for example, GPU compositing, and it breaks everything (yeah, I’ve been there), you have your recovery media you made earlier to save your bacon.

Install Linux

One of those complicated things that has been made simple by the work of great developers, installing Linux on your Chromebook is a great way expand its capabilities. Chrome OS is a flavor of Linux, but it’s been trimmed down and many features have been removed. We’re going to look at the simple (and in my opinion the best) way to build a dual-boot environment so you have both Chrome OS and Ubuntu LTS using David Schneider’s excellent tool called crouton (Chromium OS Universal Chroot Environment).

You’ll need to enable developer mode on your Chromebook, and the method varies from device to device. You may need to flip a hidden switch, or enter a key combination during boot. You can find exactly how to enable developer mode for your Chromebook on Google, and once you’ve done that everything else is the same no matter which model you use.

Once you’re a developer (or at least in dev mode) you’ll need to head to the crouton project page at github and download the script from the top of the page. Save it to your Downloads folder and you’re ready to get started.

Open a terminal (I told you Chrome OS was Linux) by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and enter the word shell to open a shell.

Next, run crouton to see all the help text and examples like this:

sh -e ~/Downloads/crouton-master

Read everything you find there, as these are your options and tell crouton what to install. If you don’t understand an option, ask someone. Also, read the help section at the crouton github page for examples and hints.

Once you have crouton set up, you’ll be able to swap between Chrome OS and a full fledged install of Linux (Ubuntu LTS) at will.

While I like the flexibility of having both Chrome OS and Ubuntu on the same machine, you may want to be rid of Chrome OS completely. If you’re interested in replacing Chrome OS with Ubuntu, have a look at the ChrUbuntu project here. If you want to replace Chrome OS on your Pixel with Debian Wheezy, grab a beverage and have a look here.

These are just a few of the neat hackery tricks you can do with your new Chromebook. And like everything else, it may turn out that none of it is for you and you prefer things that just work as intended. That’s cool, and sometimes when I’m staring at the screen of a device that won’t boot, I’m right there with ya.

If you do want to dive in and have a go at Chrome OS, this is how I do it. Tell me how you do it in the comments, I’d love to hear about it!

RootJunky

How to set up SuperSu root manager after root

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How to set up SuperSu root manager after root

If you have SuperSu on your device you must be familiar with rooting. So what is SuperSu application and what can you do with it? In general it is the tool which manages root permissions for all the applications on the phone which require root, with SuperSu you can select which apps have root access and which do not.

Lets have a look inside SuperSu, inside you have 3 sections: Apps, Logs and Settings.

The 1st section (APPS) shows you list of  applications installed on the device which asked for root access.

Click on app to open menu: next to option ACCESS you can select PROMPT, GRANT or DENY, depending if you want application to gain root privileges. Try to keep list of apps with granted permissions as short as you can, allow permissions only for the apps which either work with root only or have more privileges with it.

Next option is NOTIFICATIONS, you can choose options: “Global Default” to see  notifications if app is gaining access on the screen or “Disabled”, to switch off annoying dialog for specific app.

The 2nd section (LOGS) Shows you which app asked for root permission, time and which action was taken (allowed or denied) in case you switched on Logging option in settings. Pretty simple. Let’s move further!

The 3nd section (SETTINGS) Settings is the largest one and the most important – Settings. Correct set up is of great importance to avoid problems.

Enable SuperSu – switches on/off root on the phone, should have checkmark for root t work;

Re-authentication – disabled in case you do not want SuperSu to ask permissions again in case app is reinstalled or upgraded. If option was enabled SuperSu will always ask again permissions for the app after upgrade/reinstallation. I keep it disabled to avoid annoying dialogue pop-up.

Default access – selects default root access for all apps in case no option was chosen when prompt appears. You can choose GRANT / PROMPT/DENY.

Auto deny countdown (available for PRO version only) – gives you option to set up countdown time on SuperSu prompt asking to grant or deny access, basically that is how long user will see prompt on the screen to decide the destiny of app, in case no option selected – default value is chosen. Keep in mind that setting the countdown more than 10 seconds may cause crashes for apps which are written not in perfect way. As for me it is a bit useless:)

Show notifications – you have two options to select: “Global Default”  – if you wish to see notifications in notification menu bar about gaining access, “Disabled” – in case notifications are annoying for you and you want to get rid of them. I always select second one.

Logging – if you are not a developer, do not plan to be developer and do not need to get debug logs from SuperSu or even do not know what it is  – select option NONE, otherwise if debugging is important choose GLOBAL DEFAULT. Keep in mind it may cause crash of the application in case root permissions are asked great deal of times and logs are saved, stored, fill up memory of the phone.

Clear logs after – time-frame during which SuperSu logs are saved in case Logging is enabled. Otherwise option is grayed out.

Logs date format – choose format of date displayed.

 The Auto-refresh apps and logs tab allows the phone automatically refresh apps and logs tabs as new entries are added. Detection depends on access and notification settings.

PIN code (Pro version only) – gives option to protect SuperSu with PIN, may be useful in case Multiusers option was enabled and different users use device.

Enable Su during boot – applies all permissions during boot in case option enabled. Otherwise, permissions are applied randomly after the boot. Better to keep option enabled for boot settings to be set up properly. This option is disabled by default – make sure you switch it on.

Launcher icon – gives you variety of SuperSu  logo options, also you can select INVISIBLE to hide icon.

Theme – select dark or light theme of SuperSu interface

Language – gives option to select convenient language from the list of available.

Install SuperSu into /system – option to make SuperSu system app, in this case you will not be able to remove it from regular application manager. To delete SuperSu you will need to use either Alternative App manager (Titanium backup), or use ADB, one more option – factory reset of the phone.

Trust system user – option to give root access to the apps that are located in /system/app (System applications).

Reinstall – designed to fix SuperSu crashes (SuperSu has stopped), click on it to clean up previous installation, then install from PlayStore. Not advised to use this option if no SuperSu issues occur.

Switch Superuser app – designed to change root manager, will clean up SuperSu. As for me SuperSu is the best app to manage root access, however if you prefer another one or just want to experiment – can try, that is your choice. Note that root can be lost during process and you will need to start all over again.

Full unroot – important option but tricky. Allows you completely remove root from device. Be careful with it – it can softbrick phone, I am seriously. Before clicking this button very important to switch off option Enable SuperSu, on the top of settings. Once done you can unroot, but not before unless you wish to flash stock firmware.

Pretty wide variety of options. Cannot really skip mentioning what to do if you selected option for SuperSu icon to be invisible.

In case the icon was hidden and you need to launch SuperSu there are a few options:

1) Dial one of codes on the dial pad, one of them may work:*#1234#* or *#*#1234#*#* or *#7873778#* or *#*#7873778#*#* (does not work on Android 6.0)

2) Download Enable_SuperSU.apk  (google it) and manually install on the phone. Once you launch it app will ask root access > hit GRANT. You will see pop-up with options to Enable Su and Make it visible (100% working).

3) Open PlayStore – find SuperSu and follow steps: Uninstall > Install > Open (sometimes may cause issue with updating binaries).

4) Use adb terminal (phone and adb drivers should be installed on PC) and type adb shell am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -n eu.chainfire.supersu/.MainActivity (100% working)

You can also use Terminal emulator (available on PlayStore) and type there am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -n eu.chainfire.supersu/.MainActivity

No need to type “adb shell” as you are already in shell 🙂

 

What if you rooted phone with the other application and now have KingUser or SuperUser but SuperSu is in your dreams and you cannot sleep even because of that.

There are several options how you can change root manager app. Keep in mind is not safe.

There are 2 options:

1) Download SuperSume application from PlayStore it costs 4$ approximately. Install it on the phone and launch > you will  get prompt asking root access > hit ALLOW. Then click on large blue button with Android guy and wait, process takes up to 5 minutes. In case nothing happens in 5 minutes – reboot phone and try again.

Phone may be rebooted automatically during process, do not panic. In case you see SuperSu after reboot  – means operation was succeed.

Open SuperSu – application will ask to update binaries – hit Continue and select Normal installation. Updating binaries may take up to 5 minutes, in case it is taking longer – reboot and try again.

In case update was successful – will get notification about that – restart the phone and use SuperSu, you are done and awesome.

In case you get error during binaries update – reboot and try again. Make sure KingUser/Kingroot was removed from the phone, if no – disable it from Application manager and try updating binaries again.

In case Kingroot/SuperUser was removed but SuperSu was not installed – try installing the one from PlayStore.

Keep in mind this method can cause bootloop and is not very safe, in case you do not want such thing to happen to your phone and have headache restoring it  think carefully why do you want to change root manager, what is purpose. Strongly NOT recommended for Alcatel, Huawei, ZTE and other Chinese phones.

2) Use adb or Terminal emulator and script to change icon. This method is more safe, but more difficult.

Firstly download mrw folder, place it in the internal storage of the phone.

Then  download ADB and drivers on the PC, connect phone and make sure it is recognized with adb. Then type: adb shell

In case you do not want to use PC/do not have it try Terminal Emulator from PlayStore on the phone> open it and ALLOW root access.

Now type following in the command line (both, PC or phone):

su

Hit enter, you will get prompt to allow root permissions, hit ALLOW.

The command line will move to next line and you will see # sign.

Now type:

sh /sdcard/mrw/root.sh

hit Enter, you will see code is running, some errors may appear but do not pay attention, SuperSu will be automatically launched in case of Success, application will ask to update binaries – hit Continue and select Normal installation. Updating binaries may take up to 5 minutes, in case it is taking longer – reboot and try again.  Make sure KingUser/Kingroot was removed from the phone, if no – disable it from Application manager and try updating binaries again.

In case update was successful you will get notification about that – restart the phone and use SuperSu. You are done and awesome.

In case SuperSu was not launched after script – check manually if you have it on the phone. If nothing appears – guess what? You are right – reboot and try again from the very beginning.

Note, script will not work in case mrv folder is located in the other location, different from specified /sdcard/mrw/root.sh

-Diana Lisovenko

Amazon Ads & Bloat Removed from the Motorola Moto G 4th gen

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Amazon Ads & Bloat Removed from the Motorola Moto G 4th gen

Hey Guys as soon as i heard that Amazon was offering a device with ads for a lower price to amazon prime member i was pumped and ready to remove those ads as soon as i got the device in hand.
well Amazon has made it really easy for us in many ways.
You can just flash one file that i have put together to remove the ads and all of the amazon apps in one shot.

Requirements

Moto G 4th gen tested on the XT1625 may work on other models i dont know.
Motorola Drivers installed
Motorola program RSDlite 6.2.4
The Files and remove-amazon-bloat.xml file i created HERE

Steps

1. Boot device into bootloader / fastboot mode by powering down then holding volume down and power until it boots
2. Open RSDlite 6.2.4 and select the remove-amazon-bloat.xml
3. press START and wait for device to reboot thats it once rebooted your amazon apps and lock screen ads are gone.

 

NOTE If you are having problems with RSDlite and windows 10 use this XT1625-Amazon-Bloat-Ads-Remover-Without-RSDLITE

Rootjunky out

NOTE The Bootloader can be unlocked through the Motorola bootloader unlock site which is awesome. BOOTLOADER UNLOCK VIDEO HERE

NOTE I put together a script that will install twrp and systemless too in one click if anyone wants it after they unlock there bootloader

If you want Amazon Underground apps back check HERE

Creating your first Android Icon Pack

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Creating your first Android Icon Pack

app icon

Notiflux a youtube fan contacted me the other day to see if i would like some custom Icons to go with my RootJunky logo and colors. I told him, I would love it.  From there Notiflux created me some awesome icons using Gimp a photo editing program. You can also use programs like Paint.net and Adobe Photoshop which is my favorite. With these cool new icons in hand I had to take on the task of creating a Icon Pack App for them.

 

paint.net

Creating your first Android Icon Pack can be a little challenging but I hope that this post will help you along the way. One of the first things you need to do it download and install the Android SDK which is included in Android StudioAfter installing Android Studio you will need to update the Android SDK to get the latest version, check this post for help.  NOTE  I used Eclipse to build my apps as that is want i am use to but if you are just getting started it is highly recommend to use Android Studio. 

eclipse

Creating your first Android Icon Pack is really easy if you use Apex Icon Pack Sample as your template. This is really helpful in getting everything to need setup and running.  Open Android Studio or Eclipse and Import the Sample app. Once done you can go ahead and make some quick edits to it and have your own icon pack app.  While editing I have found it easier to look at the XML files instead of the Graphical layout or resource views, its is much more logical this way.

A couple really good recourse to help you in editing the Apex Icon Pack Sample can be found Here and Here. The main files that you will be editing are the files in folder RES and SRC the rest of these files can me left alone for the most part. You can put your edited Icons in the drawable-xhdpi folder. Once you have make all your edits you can either run the app on a connected phone over adb or you can export the app to a APK file and then install it on any device you want to.

It you have a day or to to read through all the this information and get a Icon Pack of your own, it can really be a lot of fun. Use your imagination and there is no telling what awesome things you might create. If you would like to Check out my Icon Pack that works with a bunch of Android home launchers like Apex and Nova click here and you can download it from the Google Play Store.

Extra Credit

Link to the files i used in my app can be found here, should be a great help if you need to compare some code like i did.

RootJunkySDL.com

Thanks to Notiflux for all his help

RootJunky Out

Please Comment and Share if you found this post helpful.

NVIDIA SHIELD Android Gaming System

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NVIDIA SHIELD Android Gaming System

459087-shield-controller-remote-credit-nvidia

 

Today we are taking a look at Nvidia’s Version of a Android TV box setup. We have already seen the Nexus Player, Ouya, Fire TV and many others but none of them compare to the Nvidia Shield android TV box.  The processing power and specs on this iteration of Android tv box is really amazing and really aimed at the gamer.  The Nvidia shield box will come with a Tegra X1 processor sporting 256-core maxwell GPU, 3GB of ram and be able to display in 4K ultra HD.  This device will be a Android Gamers dream.

Just like all the other Shield device Nvidia has made you will be able to stream games with Nvidia Grid. What’s more is that NVIDIA has worked with partners to port major game titles to Android, specifically for devices powered by the X1 processor. Games like Crysis 3, Doom 3: BFG Edition, Borderlands 2, Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, The Talos Principle, Metal Gear Solid: Revengeance and Resident Evil 5 among others.

Now the best part off all about this device is the price just $199.99 this includes the Nvidia Shield android tv Box, shield remote, and shield controller. The release date is in may 2015 in the us. I for one cant wait to check this device out.

images

 

Nvidia Shield Android TV Specs

  • NVIDIA Tegra X1 Processor with 256-core Maxwell GPU
  • 3GB RAM
  • 4K Ultra-HD Ready with 4K playback and capture up to 60fps (VP9, H265, H264)
  • Audio Features: 7.1 and 5.1 surround sound pass through over HDMI, High-resolution audio playback up to 24-bit/192kHz over HDMI and USB, High-resolution audio upsample to 24-bit/192hHz over USB
  • 16GB on board storage, MicroSD slot supporting 128GB
  • Wireless: 802.11ac 2×2 MIMO 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth: 4.1/BLE
  • Interfaces: Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI 2.0, Two USB 3.0 (Type A), Micro-USB 2.0
  • IR Receiver (compatible with Logitech Harmony)

Check out Nvidia Shield console official page HERE along with a cool video on it

HTC One M9

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HTC One M9 Plus VR Powered by VALVE

Official-HTC-One-M9-renders-price-and-almost-full-specs-allegedly-leaked

HTC One M9

I am sure many of you have seen or even owned a M7 or M8 and know that it is one premium device made of a nice metal unibody build. The HTC One M9 isnt any different but this time HTC added a two tone look to it that i kind of like. The back still has the silver brushed metal but the edges have a nice looking gold metal shine. I think this just adds to the premium look and feel of the M9. Other big changes to note about the M9 is that HTC finally got rid of there back ultra pixel camera and now has a 20mp back camera which i think will be a very big improvement. For those of you that love the ultra pixels, you are also in luck since HTC just moved that camera to the front. Lets talk speed this bad boy will be rocking a Snapdragon 810 octa core CPU based on the 64-bit architecture. The M9 will also have 3GB of ram giving this new HTC device some real processing power and of course it will still have those amazing boomsound speakers we all love. I cant wait to get my hands on this device. make sure you subscribe to my youtube channel for full coverage of the M9 along with any hacking rooting and modding i will be doing on it.

htc_one_m9_2_render

Here is HTC’s official page for the HTC One M9.

 Basic Specs

  • CPU Speed

    • Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 810, octa core
    • 64-bit, 4 x 2.0GHz + 4 x 1.5GHz
  • Memory1

    • ROM: 32GB / RAM: 3GB
    • Extended memory: microSD™ up to 128 GB
  • Camera

    • Main camera: 20MP with sapphire cover lens, auto-focus, BSI sensor, f/2.2, 27.8mm lens, 4K video recording
    • Front camera: HTC UltraPixel™, BSI sensor, f/2.0, 26.8mm lens, 1080p video recording
  • Display

    5.0 inch, Full HD 1080p

  • Sound

    HTC BoomSound™ with Dolby Audio™

  • Battery3

    • Capacity: 2840 mAh
    • Talk time: Up to 25.4 hours for 2G/ 21.7 hours for 3G
    • Standby time: Up to 391 hours for 2G/ 402hours for 3G

HTC VR powered by VALVE

htc-vive-pr-630

 

Here is a picture of the New HTC VR that is in developement. check out the official site HERE