Magic Leap is Moving into Mobile

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Magic Leap is Moving into Mobile

Augmented reality has been all the rage the past few years.  From headsets to mobile apps we’ve seen it start to infiltrate every piece of technology.  One of the companies behind this infiltration is Magic Leap.  They released their first headset last August after nearly 10 years of development work.  And now it seems their looking to up the ante by bridging the gap between headsets and phones.

Magic Leap’s History:

Magic Leap has been flying under the radar for quite some time now.  Their central product is a head-mounted virtual retina display which superimposes 3D images over real-world objects.  That’s the fancy way of saying AR goggles.  And fancy they are!  The company has raised more than $1.4 billion in investment capital since 2010 and in 2016 was valued at $4.5 billion by Forbes.

So the company has some serious backers, and in 2018 when they released their goggles for the first time they were available only to investors.  I wish I could say I’ve tried them on, but I unfortunately can’t attest to their experience.  CNBC, however, was granted an exclusive trial run of the goggles and the description is quite amazing.

Their tester wrote about how he was able to “place” a tv anywhere in a room to watch an NBA game. What’s more he could also place a 3D rendering of the entire game on the floor and walk around it seeing live gameplay from every angle.  Seriously, just think about this for a second and all the possibilities it holds!

Seeking AR Mobile Developers:

The goggles can already do some pretty sweet things, and when they came out in August they came with a mobile support app.  The main purpose of this was to help users with setup, but it seems now Magic Leap is hoping to go further.  Earlier this month they posted a job description for a senior software engineer with experience in mobile AR.  The description says

“In this role, you will help build a cross-platform framework that enables large scale shared AR experiences between mobile devices (iOS, Android) and Magic Leap devices. Your work will include implementing high-performance, production quality AR and computer vision algorithms, and designing and building the Magic Leap mobile SDK.”

ARKit and ARCore:

It also lists the developer should have experience with ARKit and ARCore, the AR frameworks by Apple and Google respectively.  The company’s CCO spoke on this saying that undoubtedly the whole world will not use Magic Leap’s goggles, but they should all have access to a smaller version of the experience.  Rio Caraeff said “…if there’s a 500 foot tall dragon in Central Park, you know we all want to see the dragon, not just the people with Magic Leap. And so we need an interoperability solution.”

Regardless of if you’re interested in Magic Leap as a company, the simple fact that AR is penetrating every corner of our world is undeniable.  That being said, the sooner you get in on the action the more likely you are to ride the wave up!  What are your thoughts on Magic Leap’s goggles?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

Building Your First Augmented Reality App Pt. 2

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Building Your First Augmented Reality App Pt. 2

Welcome to part two of this Augmented Reality tutorial.  Now that we’re done with the boring set-up process, we’re ready to dive into Unity and see a final product!

As a quick review, in part 1 you created a Vuforia account and a license key.  Then on Vuforia’s website you created a database to hold your image target (the dollar bill) and downloaded that along with our 3D elephant.  Finally you downloaded/opened Unity (our game editor) and changed the build settings to Android.  Ok, now let’s continue from there:

Setting our Package Name:

Remember how last time we opened “Player Settings” and then the tab that said “XR Settings”?  Well there are a few more small things we’ll have to do in this section.  Instead of “XR Settings” open up the “Other Settings” tab.  Every app that is published on the Google Play Store needs a unique ID so that it doesn’t get mixed up with other apps.  So while you may see two apps with the same name, under the hood their ID’s are different.  This ID is known as the app’s package name.

In our “Other Settings” tab we’ll write what we want our package name to be.  This can be whatever you want, but I’ll use “com.rootjunky.vuforiaelephant”.  Now my app has an ID and Unity will be able to run it on any mobile phone.  Also go ahead and uncheck the box “Android TV Compatibility”, since this app won’t work on Android TVs.

Now to import all of our materials from the first post.  In your Unity project you should see a section for the Project hierarchy.  This shows all the files/resources in the project, and we’ll be storing everything inside the folder named Assets.  We already have our Vuforia files in here, and to get everything else into this folder you can click and drag the following into the Assets folder:

  1. The Vuforia database you downloaded
  2. The 3D elephant model

Creating the Scene:

Once all of these assets are together we can begin messing with our scene.  Go to “file” then “Save Scene”, and save this scene as main (we can think of scenes as different parts of our game, but we only need one for this project).    Now inside of our scene’s hierarchy right click on the Main Camera and delete it.  Then click “Create” -> “Vuforia” -> “AR Camera”.  This will add Vuforia’s custom camera to our scene that takes care of all image targeting (i.e. recognizing dollar bills).

But now that we have the AR camera, we still need to tell it to look for a dollar bill, and to place an elephant on top of that dollar bill once we find it.  To do this select “Create” -> “Vuforia” -> “Camera Image” -> “Camera Image Target”.  If you click on an object in the scene the right-side tab will show details about it, and selecting the Image Target will display a detail section titles “Image Target Behavior”.  In here set Type to “Predefined”, Database to “DollarElephant”, and Image Target to “dollarTarget” (see the following image).

Setting these values connects our database to the image target, so now our camera knows to look for a dollar bill.  But in order to use Vuforia we also need to add our license key.  Make sure you have this still copied to your clipboard, and then selected the AR Camera in the scene.  One of the details you’ll see appear for it is labeled “Vuforia Behaviour”,  In here click the Open Vuforia configuration button and then paste in your App License Key.  Then in the Databases dropdown check the boxes that say “Load DollarElephant Data” and “Activate”.

Displaying The Elephant:

Now for the final step: attaching our elephant.  Find the elephant model inside of your Assets folder (most likely named “source” right now).  Click and drag this little guy onto your ImageTarget in the Hierarchy tab.  This will make the elephant become a “child” of the ImageTarget.

Chances are things look funky though on your screen, and this is because the elephant model is HUGE.  Inside of its Inspector tab we can change its position, rotation, and scale, so lets drop its x, y, and z values for scale down to 0.1.  Then set the position to 0 for the x and z axis, and 0.5 for the y axis (this just raises the elephant a bit so he’s on top of the dollar).

And that’s it!  We’ve attached our Vuforia files to the scene and bound a 3D model to Vuforia’s image target.  With just a few steps we’re now ready to see our augmented reality creation come to life. Connect your phone to your computer (make sure it’s USB Debuggable) and then go to File -> Build Settings again.  Select “Build and Run”, and your game will download onto the connected device.

When the app is up and running point it at any dollar bill, and you’ll see a virtual elephant appear on top.  What’s even cooler is that if you pick up the dollar and move it around the elephant will stay on top.

Congratulations on sticking through this whole process.  It’s very possible you got stuck along the way, and if that’s the case just comment below and I’ll try to help you out.  And if you’re interested in learning more about Android development then you can always check out Phonlab’s course HERE.

Building Your First Augmented Reality App

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We’ve talked before about how influential augmented reality is going to be in the future.  What we didn’t mention is how easy it can be to take part in shaping that future.  Over the course of the next two posts we’ll show how to incorporate AR into an app, and when it’s all said and done we’ll be able to look at a virtual elephant in the real world.

It’s not too complicated as far as subject material goes, but there a couple steps involved so we’ll split this into two pieces: gathering our resources and then putting them into action.

Before we do any work though, let’s take a second to discuss the bigger picture of what we’ll be doing here.  If you’ve ever experimented with game development, then you’ve probably heard of Unity.  If not, then some things in this tutorial may seem a little confusing at first (but far from impossible!).  Unity is a development environment where developers can make 2D and 3D games, and we’ll be using it here to host our augmented reality app.  Click here to download Unity, and when you do make sure that you include the Android/iOS and Vuforia plugins.

We all know about Android and iOS, but odds are Vuforia is a new name.  Vuforia is a popular AR platform that allows us to use image targeting in our apps.  Essentially all we have to do is pick a 3D model and an image.  Vuforia will then root our 3D model to any images it sees in the real world.

For example, in this app we’ll be using a 3D model of an elephant made with Blender, and the image will be a $1 bill.  With this combination, any time our app’s camera finds a dollar bill in the real world, it will place the 3D model on top of it.  The result is the title image of this post.

Ok, that’s enough background.  Let’s jump into the actual set up.  Use the above link to download Unity if you don’t already have it, and then go to developer.Vuforia.com and create an account.  After you’ve made an account click on the develop tab and then click to create a new license key.  You can name this anything you want, but as you can see in this image I chose “VuforiaElephant” as my name.

After creating the license key you’ll be able to click on it and see a string of random characters representing it.  Copy and paste this value; we’ll be using it later in this tutorial. 

We create this license key so that our app in Unity will be able to connect to our Vuforia account.  Now for the second step we’ll need to do create a database inside of Vuforia to hold our dollar bill image.  Change your selection from License Manager to Target Manager and then add a new database.  I’ve named mine “DollarElephant”.  Inside of this database we’ll click “Add Target” to add a new target.  Pull any image of a dollar bill from Google images and add it here.  Then set it’s width value to 5 and give it a name (dollarTarget is just fine).

When you’re done with this click to download the database, and that’s everything we’ll need to do in Vuforia.  Before moving into Unity let’s also get the 3D model of an elephant we want to use.  Click here to download the elephant made by sagarkalbande (and feel free to try this out with a different model).  Save this file onto your computer and now let’s move into Unity.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed right now, don’t worry we’re not going to do much else in this first part.  For now let’s open Unity and create a new project named “VuforiaElephant”.  Go to “File”, then “Build Settings” and select Android as your Platform.  After making this change the little Unity cube should appear next to Android.

Finally inside of the Build Settings window click on “Player Settings” and a bar of options will appear on the right side of your screen showing setting options.  Open the tab that says “XR Settings” and check the box that adds Vuforia Augmented Reality to our project.  Go ahead and import the settings that Unity says it needs to add, and now we’re ready to start the fun stuff.

If you’ve made it this far down the blog, then good work sticking through the dry steps.  We created a Vuforia account, made a license key, and selected a dollar bill as our image target.  Then we downloaded our elephant 3D model and created a new project in Unity.

So now we just have to make the connection inside of our Unity app between the dollar and the elephant.  Stay tuned for the second part of this tutorial in the next few days and we’ll finish out the project so that everyone can have their own virtual elephant! Does app development have you completely lost? Check out Phonlab Android app development classes HERE

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