Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

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Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

Android is the world’s most popular mobile operating system, and for good reason.  It’s created both high end and affordable options for users worldwide to experience what it has to offer.  And what is has to offer has been time and time again improved upon.  That being said, improvements are always happening in the tech world, and 5 years from now Android might not hold it’s place as #1.  Here’s a curve ball for you: I’m not talking about Apple.  Android’s upcoming replacement may be Fuchsia.

Wait…what the heck is Fuchsia?

For a few years now a stealthy group on engineers at Google have been working on Fuchsia.  The project came into existence as a potential solution to Android’s limitations.  It’s being designed with voice interactions and security updates in mind where the current Android platform falls short.  And while this has been quiet, it hasn’t been locked down.  Some of the code has been open source since 2016 and outside app developers have been allowed to experiment with it.

The Fuchsia team has a higher goal than just more efficient software though.  They’re attempting to design something that will make interaction with all in-house gadgets a fluid experience.  Imagine a single operating system that controls all your speakers, tv, and other residential tech.  Now imagine also being able to interact with all of these devices by speaking to them.  Your house becomes a sentient being, somewhat like this post we wrote a few months back.

So Android will be gone in 5 years?

No, I definitely exaggerated in that first paragraph.  5 years would be an insanely quick turnaround for Android to completely fall off the map.  Android currently dominates as king with roughly 75% market share compared to Apple’s 15%.  Still, it’s far from perfect.  There are performance, privacy, and security concerns with out of date Android phones that need to be addressed, and a new software like Fuchsia could help jump that transition forward.  All the same we’ll be seeing Android phones for quite some time still, and P hasn’t even reached the market!

Fuschia is being developed with audio interactions at its core.  There haven’t been any apps built on it at a serious commercial level yet, but rumors are flying that we’ll be seeing a YouTube app with voice command soon.  My prediction is that over the next year or two Fuchsia is going to grow in the open source community until its eventual official launch, at which point we’re going to see a boom (hopefully a quicker boom than new Android version adoption rates!).  I’ll be keeping a close eye on it, so stay tuned for more updates.  And if you have any thoughts about Fuchsia or it’s potential let us know here!

 

Building Your First Augmented Reality App Pt. 2

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Building Your First Augmented Reality App Pt. 2

Welcome to part two of this Augmented Reality tutorial.  Now that we’re done with the boring set-up process, we’re ready to dive into Unity and see a final product!

As a quick review, in part 1 you created a Vuforia account and a license key.  Then on Vuforia’s website you created a database to hold your image target (the dollar bill) and downloaded that along with our 3D elephant.  Finally you downloaded/opened Unity (our game editor) and changed the build settings to Android.  Ok, now let’s continue from there:

Setting our Package Name:

Remember how last time we opened “Player Settings” and then the tab that said “XR Settings”?  Well there are a few more small things we’ll have to do in this section.  Instead of “XR Settings” open up the “Other Settings” tab.  Every app that is published on the Google Play Store needs a unique ID so that it doesn’t get mixed up with other apps.  So while you may see two apps with the same name, under the hood their ID’s are different.  This ID is known as the app’s package name.

In our “Other Settings” tab we’ll write what we want our package name to be.  This can be whatever you want, but I’ll use “com.rootjunky.vuforiaelephant”.  Now my app has an ID and Unity will be able to run it on any mobile phone.  Also go ahead and uncheck the box “Android TV Compatibility”, since this app won’t work on Android TVs.

Now to import all of our materials from the first post.  In your Unity project you should see a section for the Project hierarchy.  This shows all the files/resources in the project, and we’ll be storing everything inside the folder named Assets.  We already have our Vuforia files in here, and to get everything else into this folder you can click and drag the following into the Assets folder:

  1. The Vuforia database you downloaded
  2. The 3D elephant model

Creating the Scene:

Once all of these assets are together we can begin messing with our scene.  Go to “file” then “Save Scene”, and save this scene as main (we can think of scenes as different parts of our game, but we only need one for this project).    Now inside of our scene’s hierarchy right click on the Main Camera and delete it.  Then click “Create” -> “Vuforia” -> “AR Camera”.  This will add Vuforia’s custom camera to our scene that takes care of all image targeting (i.e. recognizing dollar bills).

But now that we have the AR camera, we still need to tell it to look for a dollar bill, and to place an elephant on top of that dollar bill once we find it.  To do this select “Create” -> “Vuforia” -> “Camera Image” -> “Camera Image Target”.  If you click on an object in the scene the right-side tab will show details about it, and selecting the Image Target will display a detail section titles “Image Target Behavior”.  In here set Type to “Predefined”, Database to “DollarElephant”, and Image Target to “dollarTarget” (see the following image).

Setting these values connects our database to the image target, so now our camera knows to look for a dollar bill.  But in order to use Vuforia we also need to add our license key.  Make sure you have this still copied to your clipboard, and then selected the AR Camera in the scene.  One of the details you’ll see appear for it is labeled “Vuforia Behaviour”,  In here click the Open Vuforia configuration button and then paste in your App License Key.  Then in the Databases dropdown check the boxes that say “Load DollarElephant Data” and “Activate”.

Displaying The Elephant:

Now for the final step: attaching our elephant.  Find the elephant model inside of your Assets folder (most likely named “source” right now).  Click and drag this little guy onto your ImageTarget in the Hierarchy tab.  This will make the elephant become a “child” of the ImageTarget.

Chances are things look funky though on your screen, and this is because the elephant model is HUGE.  Inside of its Inspector tab we can change its position, rotation, and scale, so lets drop its x, y, and z values for scale down to 0.1.  Then set the position to 0 for the x and z axis, and 0.5 for the y axis (this just raises the elephant a bit so he’s on top of the dollar).

And that’s it!  We’ve attached our Vuforia files to the scene and bound a 3D model to Vuforia’s image target.  With just a few steps we’re now ready to see our augmented reality creation come to life. Connect your phone to your computer (make sure it’s USB Debuggable) and then go to File -> Build Settings again.  Select “Build and Run”, and your game will download onto the connected device.

When the app is up and running point it at any dollar bill, and you’ll see a virtual elephant appear on top.  What’s even cooler is that if you pick up the dollar and move it around the elephant will stay on top.

Congratulations on sticking through this whole process.  It’s very possible you got stuck along the way, and if that’s the case just comment below and I’ll try to help you out.  And if you’re interested in learning more about Android development then you can always check out Phonlab’s course HERE.

Building Your First Augmented Reality App

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We’ve talked before about how influential augmented reality is going to be in the future.  What we didn’t mention is how easy it can be to take part in shaping that future.  Over the course of the next two posts we’ll show how to incorporate AR into an app, and when it’s all said and done we’ll be able to look at a virtual elephant in the real world.

It’s not too complicated as far as subject material goes, but there a couple steps involved so we’ll split this into two pieces: gathering our resources and then putting them into action.

Before we do any work though, let’s take a second to discuss the bigger picture of what we’ll be doing here.  If you’ve ever experimented with game development, then you’ve probably heard of Unity.  If not, then some things in this tutorial may seem a little confusing at first (but far from impossible!).  Unity is a development environment where developers can make 2D and 3D games, and we’ll be using it here to host our augmented reality app.  Click here to download Unity, and when you do make sure that you include the Android/iOS and Vuforia plugins.

We all know about Android and iOS, but odds are Vuforia is a new name.  Vuforia is a popular AR platform that allows us to use image targeting in our apps.  Essentially all we have to do is pick a 3D model and an image.  Vuforia will then root our 3D model to any images it sees in the real world.

For example, in this app we’ll be using a 3D model of an elephant made with Blender, and the image will be a $1 bill.  With this combination, any time our app’s camera finds a dollar bill in the real world, it will place the 3D model on top of it.  The result is the title image of this post.

Ok, that’s enough background.  Let’s jump into the actual set up.  Use the above link to download Unity if you don’t already have it, and then go to developer.Vuforia.com and create an account.  After you’ve made an account click on the develop tab and then click to create a new license key.  You can name this anything you want, but as you can see in this image I chose “VuforiaElephant” as my name.

After creating the license key you’ll be able to click on it and see a string of random characters representing it.  Copy and paste this value; we’ll be using it later in this tutorial. 

We create this license key so that our app in Unity will be able to connect to our Vuforia account.  Now for the second step we’ll need to do create a database inside of Vuforia to hold our dollar bill image.  Change your selection from License Manager to Target Manager and then add a new database.  I’ve named mine “DollarElephant”.  Inside of this database we’ll click “Add Target” to add a new target.  Pull any image of a dollar bill from Google images and add it here.  Then set it’s width value to 5 and give it a name (dollarTarget is just fine).

When you’re done with this click to download the database, and that’s everything we’ll need to do in Vuforia.  Before moving into Unity let’s also get the 3D model of an elephant we want to use.  Click here to download the elephant made by sagarkalbande (and feel free to try this out with a different model).  Save this file onto your computer and now let’s move into Unity.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed right now, don’t worry we’re not going to do much else in this first part.  For now let’s open Unity and create a new project named “VuforiaElephant”.  Go to “File”, then “Build Settings” and select Android as your Platform.  After making this change the little Unity cube should appear next to Android.

Finally inside of the Build Settings window click on “Player Settings” and a bar of options will appear on the right side of your screen showing setting options.  Open the tab that says “XR Settings” and check the box that adds Vuforia Augmented Reality to our project.  Go ahead and import the settings that Unity says it needs to add, and now we’re ready to start the fun stuff.

If you’ve made it this far down the blog, then good work sticking through the dry steps.  We created a Vuforia account, made a license key, and selected a dollar bill as our image target.  Then we downloaded our elephant 3D model and created a new project in Unity.

So now we just have to make the connection inside of our Unity app between the dollar and the elephant.  Stay tuned for the second part of this tutorial in the next few days and we’ll finish out the project so that everyone can have their own virtual elephant! Does app development have you completely lost? Check out Phonlab Android app development classes HERE

Android Kanging

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Android Kanging

What is Android Kanging or to Kang a rom, theme, or mod? Lets start with a Android definition of Kanging: To have one’s developer code and work taken, manipulated, rebranded, and re-released by someone else with no credit given. In no way is this illegal or even stealing because android is open source and cant be sold. Open source is awesome :D. This practice of Kanging someones work is done quite often and is very much frowned upon by all in the Android Community. It is basically a slap in the face to the developer that originally created it. It steals the Glory and praise from the creator of the code and the coppier takes credit instead. I think many times the Kanger knows he is copping someones work but doesnt even remember or know whos it is and is just lazy or forgets to credit the right people. There is so much android code and awesomeness floating around the internet some new developers dont even know who to credit.

So really to avoid being a kanger it is simple.

1. Find out whos code you are using in your rom and credit the right person

On that note please go make the best and most amazing rom you can with as much cool code from anywhere you can find it. Us in the Android community love the work of all developers and making one awesome rom is the best.  But remember that Kanging has a bad connotation if not giving credit where credits due.

Examples:

If you have SuperSU in your rom you need to Credit Chainfire

If you have Superuser in your rom then Koush would be the guy.

really its pretty simple so lets give credit where credit is due.

Below is picture of Android Open Kang Project or AOKP which is a example of a Good Kang Rom. rhis rom takes lots of code and puts it all together to make one awesome rom but give credit to the right developers in doing it.

AOKP