Searching For Privacy

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Searching For Privacy

We’ve grown somewhat used to the phrase “If you’re doing nothing wrong then you have nothing to hide”.  That being said, plenty of us don’t take it as truth that privacy has to die.  There are countless stories of security leaks, and it’s impossible to hear the letters NSA without thinking about being watched.  But taking a few simple steps can drastically improve your right to privacy in everyday life.  Step one being how you browse the internet.

You don’t have to be watched:

Yes, it’s a little-known secret, but there are ways you can search the web without giving up your privacy.  Over the years the word “Google” has become synonymous to looking something up.  And for good reason because Google has a huge market share on global searches.  But they’re by no means your only option.  At the start of 2018 Google searches accounted for roughly 70% of all searches.  The bottom line being that they aren’t going away any time soon, but there’s 30% worth of other options.

The purpose of this blog post is not to bash Google by any means.  It’s an incredible search engine that yields top tier results.  It’s grown to the size it is for many reasons.  This post is simply to inform you of options besides the traditional search engines like Google and Internet Explorer.  There are some players that do things differently.  A key difference being that your search history is just that: yours.

Some alternatives:

If you’ve ever looked into private search engines, then you’re undoubtedly familiar with DuckDuckGo.  Its CEO is famous for saying “if the FBI comes to us, we have nothing to tie back to you.”  Their motto is simple: they don’t store your personal information. Ever.  They also offer an interesting feature known as “bangs”.  Not really privacy related, but bangs allow you to quickly search results on other sites by adding a “!” to your search.  So if you knew you wanted to search for something on Wikipedia you could jump straight to it.

Another solid option is Tor.  Tor Browser secures your connection to the internet with three layers of encryption, and passes it through voluntarily operated servers around the world.  It’s goal is to make you one in a million person crowd that is indistinguishable from others, and thus untargeted for any kind of privacy extraction.  Tor’s onion services allow for users to publish things online without needing to reveal their location.  Even the U.S. Navy has used Tor for open source intelligence gathering.  Don’t worry, by that I don’t mean info on your browsing sessions!

A 3rd favorite is StartPage.  Developed by Ixquick, StartPage gets you the privacy you want but actually gives you the results straight from Google. It features a proxy service, URL generator, and HTTPS support that allow you to revisit your browsing sessions without needing cookies.  In other words, it remembers your browsing in a privacy friendly way.

More than just security:

If you’re like me, you’ve been shocked before at some of the ads you see.  They’ve become so practical at targeting you you’ll see an ad for something you had only thought about in the privacy of your own mind.  Browsing in private mode can certainly help with this as the less data there is collected on you, the harder it is to target you with personalized ads.  Or even ads in general.  Just another big perk to consider when deciding if you want to check out other browsers!

All in all, you could be perfectly happy with the way you’re surfing the internet right now, but there are always other options if you decide to give them a try.  What are your thoughts on the recent privacy issues?  Maybe you use a VPN. Do you take other precautions to keep your information secure?  Let us know in the comments below!

The Pixel 3 has been unveiled, and it looks sweet!

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The Pixel 3 has been unveiled, and it looks sweet!

We’ve talked about the Pixel 3 again and again here at RootJunky, and there have been far too many rumors and leaks about it over the past few months.  I’m happy to say that’s all come to a close.  Not because I don’t like writing about it, but because the Pixel 3 has officially been released. Earlier today Google unveiled the new phone, and the preorders have begun rolling in.

The Hype Recap:

Before we get in to what the Pixel 3 and 3XL actually are, let’s take a second to remember how much build up there was about these devices.  There were images leaked on the XDADeveloper forum showing a notched display with two cameras, as well as a glass back for wireless charging.  But hardware leaks aside, what was really interesting about this phone’s build up was the rumors about rumors.

After we’d all sat with the leaked images for a bit the news surfaces that Google was reaching out to popular YouTuber’s asking to use their clips bashing the leaked design.  The result of this was the people began thinking Google had intentionally leaked images so that they could use this footage in their grand reveal of a more impressive phone.  It was a conspiracy theory for sure, but not entirely unbelievable.

Fast-forward to October 9th’s Hardware:

Skipping to today the Pixel actually dropped, and it actually doesn’t look that different from the leaked images.  Despite what some YouTuber’s may have said I don’t think that’s a bad thing.  Starting at $799, the Pixel 3 sticks to the traditional design of a split material back allowing for wireless charging (thank goodness!).  The regular phone measures in at 5.5 inches and for $100 more the XL measures in at 6.3 inches.

Pixel phones have been notorious for having great cameras, and that trend isn’t stopping with the Pixel 3. It is however deciding to avoid the current trend of a dual rear camera.  With a total of 3 cameras, one can be found on the back and two on the front.  And guess what?  For the XL these cameras are nested in a notch.  This trend seems to be sticking around for a while, and even Google’s flagship device has embraced it.  The new cameras seek to take the crown and offer incredible zoom in as well as a wide range selfie mode.

Screening the Spammers:

Remember that ground breaking release from Google I/O earlier this year called Duplex?  It seemed unreal as the Google Assistant called a barber shop, had a conversation with the receptionist, and successfully booked an appointment for its user.
Well the Pixel 3 leverages this technology to make your call screening much more enjoyable.  Using Duplex, you’ll never have to answer the phone for a telemarketer again.

The Pixel 3 can answer itself and provide a real-time transcript to you of whatever the caller says. Duplex prompts them on the other side of the line asking them to identify themselves and let you know if the call is urgent, and as they talk you can see the text appear on your screen.
Then if you want to answer you can, or you can select from premade responses to keep the conversation going and get more details before deciding to pick up or not.  Google Assistant really is becoming a personal secretary.

I’m really excited for the Pixel 3 to be out and will be getting my hands on it as soon as I can. What are your thoughts on the new device?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Minus And Project Strobe

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Google Minus and Project Strobe

After 7 years of effort Google has decided that enough is enough for Google+.  The tech giant has admitted to failing its entrance into the social media marketplace. As both a business decision and safety concern they’ve decided to take Google+ off the web and focus on other things.

Project Strobe

Security has been at the forefront of everyone’s minds this year as privacy scandal after privacy scandal has surfaced.  Facebook’s Cambridge Analytics scandal made us hyper aware of how much data is exposed to third-parties.  In an attempt to combat privacy issues Google launched Project Strobe.  It’s a root-and-branch review of third-party developer access to Google accounts and Android devices.  Essentially it’s a research project to check up on how secure everyone’s information really is.

The findings: not the best.   Today Google announced four key findings from the project along with steps to remedy each.

1. There are significant challenges in creating and maintain a successful Google+ product that meets consumer’s expectations.

Google+ has a pretty serious bug in it that exposed user data to third-party applications that didn’t have proper access.  Google says that there is no evidence anyone else found this out before they did (hard to be sure).  But combining this with the lack of adoption among users and the end result has been to remove Google+ entirely.  I don’t think anyone is too upset at this move, and it’s probably for the best Google diverts its time towards new innovations.

2. People want fine-grained controls over the data they share with apps

When you download a new app that performs certain functions, it may need permission to do so.  Whether that’s accessing your camera to take a picture or seeing your contacts so that it can share a picture with others, apps can’t do these things until you let them.  This is a big plus for Android security, but unfortunately sometimes it’s not organized well enough.

There are some permissions that are grouped together when presented to a user, and this can potentially be a problem.  If you want an app to do one thing you shouldn’t have to grant it access to 3 permission, yet this is sometimes how things are organized.  Google has announced they’ll be launching more granular account permissions that will show individual dialog boxes for each.  Maybe a little more frustrating for relaxed users, but definitely a win for security.

3. When users grant apps access to their Gmail, they do so with certain user cases in mind

To correct the security issue of third-parties abusing contact information Google is limiting what kinds of apps are allowed to access Gmail data.  The only apps allowed will be those that are “directly enhancing email functionality”.  Basically, if there’s not real reason for your app to need to write an email, it’s banned.

4. When users grant SMS, Contacts and Phone permissions to Android apps they do so with certain use cases in mind.

3 and 4 are pretty similar to one another, but this other finding takes things past email and into the phone/contacts.  Google is limiting how many apps will be allowed to access this information.  In addition to this Contact interaction data will no longer be available vie the Android Contacts API.

The bottom line is that Google did a security sweep and decided a few things needed to change.  It seems that these changes are proactive which is always a good things, but if you’re one of the world’s Google+ user’s then I’m sorry you have to say goodbye.  For everyone else these changes should be nothing but good as security continues to improve.

What are your thoughts on Project Strobe?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

Rumors About Rumors About the Pixel 3

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Rumors About Rumors About the Pixel 3

Over the past few months rumors have been floating around left and right about the upcoming Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL.  We’ve written about leaks here before as a serious of photos have surfaced revelaing potential designs.  Of particular interest are the XL leaks with the notch taking phone manufacturers by storm these days.  These are so interesting not because of what they show, but what they may be hiding.

The newest rumor going around is that the Pixel 3 XL we’ve seen thus far is a fake.  And not simply fake that someone decided to make up, but rather a fake that was released by Google to throw people off.  It’s a bold claim, but not entirely impossible.  Here’s why:

Hating The Notch:

When the XL leaks first surfaced a lot of people got excited.  And likewise a lot of people were upset to see that the notch was involved.  The 3 is set to bring back other exciting features like wireless charging, yet the notch seems to be what gained so much attention.  Some well known YouTubers have critiqued the design on their channels.  Google has taken note.

According to Jon Prosser, one of the YouTubers who spoke out against the leak, Google reached out to him and asked for a very specific clip of him speaking badly about the design.  He found out from other YouTubers that the same request was made to quite a few of them.  Google didn’t say why it wanted the footage, but simply asked for it.

What’s Google’s Game?

So why would Google want to use footage from well known reviewers bashing its product?  Well, the natural conclusion is that it’s not really their product.  If people hate the design that’s been leaked and it turns out that’s not actually the desing Google is unveiling in October, then no harm no foul.  Actually if anything it could help Google as they market that they’ve listened to people’s feedback and are moving in a direction that consumers want.

It’s possible (but not confirmed) that Google has artificially leaked things in an attempt to generate a buzz about the new phones.  If that’s the case then it’s definitely worked.  As to the probability of this actually ocurring…well that’s another story.  Only time will tell, but you could argue it’s pretty farfetched.  It would be incredibly hard to keep this kind of fake leak in house up until now.

Pie and The Notch

The Pixel 3 will also be the first phone to come with Android Pie which includes notch support.  The two don’t have to come in a package deal, but it would be a little strange to see that as a feature in Pie and not have it avaiable to users who buy the first phone with it.

What do you think of these rumors about rumors?  Whether you think its plausible or ridiculous let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Fortnite Could Change The App Market As We Know It

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Fortnite Could Change The App Market As We Know It

Fortnite, the first person survival shooter game that has taken the world by storm, has finally made its way to Android.  I’m sure it will be a blast to play, but this isn’t the place to read reviews of videogames.  So why are we bringing it up?  Because Fortnite with its popularity has brought some light to a very deep discussion for what the future of apps looks like.  It’s more than a videogame, it’s the start of a movement.

Some Background

For those who aren’t familiar with the game’s success thus far, Fortnite has become one of the most popular games of all time and is played on PCs, gaming consoles, and iPads/iPhones.  It’s been developed for all of these different systems so that virtually anyone that has an electronic gadget has the opportunity to play, and for months now its been building up to its Android debut. 

This would just be another story of a successful video game, except that Epic Games (Fortnite’s creator) has made a bold decision for its distribution strategy.  They decided to forgo the common pathway of sharing their app on the Google Play Store.  Instead they will be distributing the app in their own digital store and keep the 30% “store tax” that Google would otherwise keep from in-app purchases.

Fortnite Paves Its Own Path

“It’s a high cost in a world where game developers’ 70 per cent must cover all the cost of developing, operating, and supporting their games.”  Epic said about the decision.  “And it’s disproportionate to the cost of the services these stores perform, such as payment processing, download bandwidth, and customer service.”

Epic has shared its opinion that the app market is a highly monopolized one where developers are unfairly being taken advantage of.  Google and Apple have grown to such high user adoption rates that users don’t get apps from anywhere else.  This means that as a developer you either play by their rules or you don’t play at all.  Epic isn’t the first entity to share this sentiment, and the EU has even recently filed a lawsuit against Google for monopoly abuse.

Breaking The Cycle

Fortnite just happens to be such an incredibly popular game that it could potentially survive playing by its own rules.  Sure it won’t get as many downloads as it would on the Google Play Store, but it could still prove a successful venture which would open a serious discussion about other companies following suit.

To give Google a little credit Android phones do have the capability to download apps from 3rd party sources, it’s just not as common or streamlined a process.  Apple on the other hand has completely rejected this philosophy and gives users the choice of their app store, or users jailbreaking their phones to get what they want.

In the age of tech giants its hard to not just accept the fact that these monopolies exist and are becoming solidified.  So when a discussion is brought to the table about a potentially unfair situation arising it’s imperative that we keep an open mind and think about what impact can be made in the long run to ensure a healthy a thriving market economy.  Anti-trust is a sticky, sticky issue, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be discussed.

The Google Play Store is a great tool that tons of developers (myself included) get to use to share their creations with the world, but every system needs checks and balances or else it will eventually experience abuse.  It will be interesting to see how successful a venture Fortnite on Android will be without involving itself in the Play Store.  What do you think about Epic’s decision?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

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Will Fuchsia be Android’s Usurper?

Android is the world’s most popular mobile operating system, and for good reason.  It’s created both high end and affordable options for users worldwide to experience what it has to offer.  And what is has to offer has been time and time again improved upon.  That being said, improvements are always happening in the tech world, and 5 years from now Android might not hold it’s place as #1.  Here’s a curve ball for you: I’m not talking about Apple.  Android’s upcoming replacement may be Fuchsia.

Wait…what the heck is Fuchsia?

For a few years now a stealthy group on engineers at Google have been working on Fuchsia.  The project came into existence as a potential solution to Android’s limitations.  It’s being designed with voice interactions and security updates in mind where the current Android platform falls short.  And while this has been quiet, it hasn’t been locked down.  Some of the code has been open source since 2016 and outside app developers have been allowed to experiment with it.

The Fuchsia team has a higher goal than just more efficient software though.  They’re attempting to design something that will make interaction with all in-house gadgets a fluid experience.  Imagine a single operating system that controls all your speakers, tv, and other residential tech.  Now imagine also being able to interact with all of these devices by speaking to them.  Your house becomes a sentient being, somewhat like this post we wrote a few months back.

So Android will be gone in 5 years?

No, I definitely exaggerated in that first paragraph.  5 years would be an insanely quick turnaround for Android to completely fall off the map.  Android currently dominates as king with roughly 75% market share compared to Apple’s 15%.  Still, it’s far from perfect.  There are performance, privacy, and security concerns with out of date Android phones that need to be addressed, and a new software like Fuchsia could help jump that transition forward.  All the same we’ll be seeing Android phones for quite some time still, and P hasn’t even reached the market!

Fuschia is being developed with audio interactions at its core.  There haven’t been any apps built on it at a serious commercial level yet, but rumors are flying that we’ll be seeing a YouTube app with voice command soon.  My prediction is that over the next year or two Fuchsia is going to grow in the open source community until its eventual official launch, at which point we’re going to see a boom (hopefully a quicker boom than new Android version adoption rates!).  I’ll be keeping a close eye on it, so stay tuned for more updates.  And if you have any thoughts about Fuchsia or it’s potential let us know here!

 

Google Fined…For Giving Users Google?

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Google Fined…For Giving Users Google?

 

Almost everyone worldwide knows about the divide between Android and iOS.  How could you not? We hear people brag about how their operating system is in every way superior to the other and people are fools for giving business to the other end of the spectrum.   But competition happens on different tiers and the E.U. recently decided that Google has been unfairly monopolizing the market.  The cost of this? $5 billion.

Some background:

The E.U has fined Google a record €4.34bn for its use of the Android operating system to “illegally cement its dominant position” in search.  The argument goes that while Google has competition on the highest tier of competition (Android vs iOS), once a user chooses to purchase an Android phone their options are severely limited.  As a phone manufacturer if you want the Google Play Store on your phones (which you definitely do), then you also have to take the Chrome browser and Google Search along with it.

Google operating systems coming preloaded with their own associated software…sounds unfair right?  Margarethe Vestager, The European Commissioner for Competition, says that it is.  Vestager argues that Google’s withholding of the Play Store except as a package deal essentially locks down the market for other search engines.  Google has also made payments to large manufacturers as part of an agreement to exclusively pre-install the Google Search app on their devices.

The commissioner has acknowledged that Android in no way forbids users from downloading other browsers if their interested (last year Opera Mini and Firefox were downloaded more than 100 million times).  She asserts that this is far too small though since few people take the action to actively change their default settings.   Google holds the real decision making power, a sign of monopoly, not free markets.

Google’s response:

So we have competition at the operating system level, and competition at the browser level.  Google has responded saying that there’s a level far more important to the world: the app level.  While the Google Play Store is owned by Google, millions of developers contribute and share their creations on it.  Sundar Pichai, Google’s CEO, released a written statement yesterday explaining how unjust the E.U. sanction really is, as Google has taken steps to encourage a competitive market.

“Rapid innovation, wide choice, and falling prices are classic hallmarks of robust competition and Android has enabled all of them,” he wrote.  With such a small barrier to entry for developers/companies who want to share their apps with the world, Android should be seen as a free market advocate, not a giant that is terrorizing our decisions.

This is where tiers of competition become crucial in the discussion.  Does google have a fair amount of competition as an operating system?  Do they have competition as a search engine/browser?  Does their Play Store have other serious contenders trying to take its place?

How hard is it to Switch?

Sundar pointed out (with a short video), that user’s can delete their default browser and download another (such as Opera Mini) within 30 seconds.  Hardly a barrier to entry in terms of difficulty.  The monopoly discussion then becomes is it reasonable to ask users to take this course of action to be presented with other options.  100 million people is a lot, but out of 2 billion worldwide android user’s it’s not a majority.  Still, if users want to find another service, the options are there.

As crazy as it is, $5 billion is a raindrop in Google’s budget.  But it’s not really about the money (yes it is…), it’s about the image that Android upholds.  As a developer that has shared my creations on the Play Store I’ve seen it encourage users to build and share with the world.   Google is an industry giant, of that there is no doubt, and Sundar signed off saying that they intent to appeal.  Stay tuned and we’ll be sure to write about where things go from here.

What are your thoughts on Google’s role as a Monopoly terror or a free market advocate?  Let us know in the comments below!

The Pixel 3 Leaks Just Keep Coming!

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The Pixel 3 Leaks Just Keep Coming!

 

If you’re a phone junky then you’ve probably been following all the buzz surrounding the upcoming Pixel 3.  And if you haven’t been but are interested in catching up, then you’ve come to the right place.  Rumors and leaks galore have been floating around this week and late discussing what the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL have in store for users.  Let’s discuss:

It’s Huge:

I’m not just talking about the hype.  The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL are going to be larger than their predecessors (is anyone surprised?).  Measuring in at 5.3’’ and 6.2’’ respectively these phones will be giving the iPhone X a run for its money in terms of screen real estate.  And also much like the iPhone…yep you guess it, there’s a notch thrown into the mix.

Just like almost every other android phone since the iPhone X’s reveal the notch seems to be playing a big role in design practices.  A few images were images have been posted on the XDADeveloper’s forum showing a Pixel 3 rocking a notched display, dual front cameras, and a back that appears to be made of glass.

New features:

Why glass on the back?  Well this has led to speculation that wireless charging may be coming back into play.  This feature was discontinued a few years back in the Nexus series after Google’s acquisition of HTC.  The argument was…not the strongest.  Google argued that Nexus phones had too much z (thickness) with the wireless charging, and that USB Type-C charging was a much simpler solution.  Maybe more efficient, but its definitely not as cool!

Of course we have to take these leaks with a grain of salt.  The Pixel’s camera is a good demonstration of this.  There’s been a lot of back and forth about whether one or two cameras are in store for the new device.  Leaked images have confirmed both cases, so its hard to know what’s really true and what is just a wannabe, but a series of images leaked by 9to5Google show a single rear camera on a Pixel 3 prototype.  This leak matters as the phone was sporting a mystery Google logo, so it gains another ounce of credibility.

Whatever the case, Pixel’s are known for their phenomenal cameras, and when the Pixel 2 came out its camera blew us away.  Since then quite a few other phones have scored higher on DxOMark (a image quality rating site), but at the time the Pixel 2 was the leader.  So odds are the Pixel 3 is going to exceed expectations again and top the charts in this manner.

New Software:

The Pixel 3 is also expected to be the first official phone rocking Android P software.  So new features like RTT-Wi-Fi and auto-adjusting batteries will open new possibilities for both users and developers.  Android P is currently available for beta use if you’re interested in exploring it early, but if you’re planning on purchasing a Pixel 3, you’ll have it in your hands before you know it.  There’s no official release date set right now, but the popular opinion is this October.  So close and yet so far.

What are you hoping the Pixel 3 will have that other phones are lacking?  Do you think it will be a let down or a leader in the industry?  Let us know in the comments below!

Android One.  Two Different Strategies

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Android One.  Two Different Strategies

Rumors have been spreading about the new Motorola One Power.  This week we got a glance at what’s coming to the market, and you may not be surprised to see that a notch is involved in the desgin.  A lot of Android phones this year have been mimicking the iPhone X’s newest feature, but there’s a lot more to the One Power than just how it looks.  It’s the head of a movement.

The One Power is sure to be a quality phone for its users.  At least a lot depends on it being that way since it will be the newest phone to carry on the Google One movement.  That movement began in 2014 as an attempt to capture the “next billion Android users” in developing countries.  It aimed to provide smartphones with current software at sub-100 dollar prices.

But How?

Typically this was possible by severly limiting specs like storage and RAM.  Users don’t have to spend much, but they can still experience all the cool new features versions like Android P have to offer.  Meanwhile Google gains a hold on smartphone marketspace that might otherwise not be filled due to price restrictions.  It’s a win win.  

At least that was the plan back then.  4 years later and the Android One movement didn’t take off exactly as the marketing team planned.  Sales faltered for the lower end phones due to their lack of being positively distinguished from their more expensive counterparts.  Appearing somewhat clunky, budget phones didn’t sell well, and there’s still a large population out there that is waiting to be capitalized on.  Android Go rose to take Android One’s place as the budget movement recently, and it looks like this new burst of marketing may have a better outlook.

Down But Not Out

That being said, Android One didn’t fade into oblivion, but instead decided to change its strategy.  It’s risen its price range to the $250-400 mark and in turn is producing sleeker more “high-end” looking phones that run on the newest softwares.  These phones are still more affordable than some, and this is thanks to the movement’s slogan “Everything you want.  Nothing you don’t.”  The phones don’t have a bunch of manufacturer customizations, but instead function similarly to Nexus and Pixel phones today.  They have Google’s apps built in, and run the latest Google software, but that’s just about it.  This is great if you’re not looking to spend a fortune and you also don’t feel the need for the extra add ons.

The One Power Up Close

The Motorola Power One will be prominently displaying a notch on its front along with a vertical dual carmera placement on its back.  Couple this with curved edges and a fingerprint sensor and we’re looking at a pretty stylish phone.  Whether you like the iPhone X or not, its undeniable that it’s style has set a trend that others a following.  How the software on the inside runs is a whole nother store though!

Do you have any thoughts on the new Motorola Power One?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

Google I/O, Until Next Year

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Google I/O, Until Next Year

Well Google I/O is a wrap everyone, and if you tuned in then hopefully you left with some cool takeaways.  If not then don’t worry, that’s what we’re here for.  When the conference first kicked off we wrote about day 1 and its highlights, but obviously the fun didn’t stop there.  The following is a crash course selection of (in my opinion) the most important and amazing takeaways for and android junky.

Flutter:

If you’re an android developer, then your undoubtedly familiar with Java and segueing in to Kotlin.  You might not have heard about Flutter before though.  It’s Google’s mobile app SDK for easily creating high quality apps on both Android and iOS devices.  Written in Dart (a language developed by Google as well), Flutter works with existing code and is used to develop at ridiculously high speeds.  Here’s a great video from Google I/O that goes more in depth on how to use Flutter to enhance your material design.

Duplex:

Now this one blows my mind, and I know I’m not alone here.  When you think of a sci-fi future it’s reasonable if computers playing our personal secretaries pops into your mind.  This seems to be the present now. 

I’m very interested to see how Duplex functions successfully in real world applications, but the Google 2018 keynote showed a quick performance of the Google Assistant booking a haircut appointment for Google’s CEO, Sundar Pichai.  From an outsider’s view the conversation was impossible to distinguish from an everyday conversation between two people, and when it was done the Google Assistant confirmed to Sundar that the appointment had been booked and added to his calendar.  It’s only a matter of time before this is both client and server side so that duplex will be having conversations with itself to schedule our days, and that’s pretty wild.

Android P Beta:

Yes, I know we discussed android P in the last blog on Google I/O.  But you’ll have to bear with me because it’s happening again! As of this week the Android P beta is available on Pixel devices as well as 7 other flagship devices.  Android P brings all kinds of cool new features to the table.  A lot of these revolve around predicting what you the user are about to do.  There’s an adaptive battery that adjusts your screen’s brightness and what apps are running in an effort to both improve your experience and conserve precious battery power.

My personal favorite feature of P is Wi-Fi RTT.  Round Trip Time takes our current location services capabilities and amplifies them.  Essentially by triangulating between multiple Wi-fi access points nearby, a user’s position can be calculated within about a meter.  Just use your imagination for what applications this could come in handy for!  For more on Android P you can read our past posts or watch some Google I/O talks.

There’s lots more to take away from Google I/O, and honestly I’m cutting myself off here because otherwise I’d end up writing a paragraph or two about every session that I watched from the entire conference.  It’s a great year to be an android developer or even just own an android device.

What interested you the most from the conference?  Let us know in the comments below!