Loot For Root

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Loot For Root

How do you feel about paying for apps like Sun Shine by Jcase and company or programs like MoFoRoot*? Here are some of my thoughts.

rooted

There are two sides to the discussion about paying for exploits and development on your android devices.  One side is obviously the developers and the other is that of the user or android community member who has been waiting for a awesome new root or unlocked bootloader method to be released.  Since there are two sides, I decided it would only be fair to contact Jcase and ask him in person why he has chosen to create a paid-for tool like Sun Shine app*. Let me start this post with a quick note: I am going to try and stay neutral in this matter until the end of the post where you will see my thoughts on the matter, so lets begin.

Here are some of Jcase’s thoughts and some of the questions I asked him.

Q:  Why make everyone pay for the Sun Shine app instead of just releasing the exploit to the android community and the world?

A:   “There are way more complaints with the free exploits than the paid versions” So I asked him to explain. When he releases free exploits they are normally not in a perfect form and may even be a bit buggy, but they still work. Jcase has no desire to make them work any better since he mainly enjoys finding the exploit, not spending tons of time making them noob friendly. Since it isn’t the easiest exploit in the world to perform on a given device, it turns into a big headache for him to deal with and ain’t nobody got time for that!

Q:  What cost is involved for you to find and create these exploits for the Android community?

A:  To answer this question Jcase gave this example. To fully test Sun Shine app he had to buy 30 Motorola Moto G phones to make sure that Sun Shine would be noob friendly. Along with this major cost, there is the time and research. He invests alot of time into the paid versions of his exploits like Sun Shine. “You get what you pay for.”

Q: Why not fund your research and expenses with donations and bounties?

A: He explained that the last bounty only paid out 30% of what was promised in the bounty thread.  Jcase continued to explain that by selling Sun Shine app, he is crowd funding his research and future development.

A few quick notes from our conversation:

1.  Working on android is for fun and done in our free time.

2.  Family time is important and Android takes a lot of time away from them.

3.  If working on Android exploits isn’t enjoyable, then he doesn’t want to do it.

4.  Jcase and the MoFoRoot Developer don’t owe the Android Community anything. If they don’t want to release Android exploits anymore, they don’t have to.

My Thoughts 

I wish that the Android community as a whole was a lot more understanding and friendly to the developers that do Android in their free time. I think that some of the community has scared off many of the developers with all their complaints and demands. If you like what a developer is doing, then support them with a donation. This will really encourage him or her to continue their work on Android. The Android community can be a really great and helpful place. I have met many of you online and love all the fun we have had together over the years. I really wish that we could go back to just donations and bounties to fund and help the developers like Jcase, but that ship has sailed. Loot for root is the new era we have found ourselves in. I, for one, am happy to pay $25.00 for a root or unlocked bootloader; this is much cheaper than buying a developer edition device.  There is just something about paying vs. donations that just gets under my skin and maybe you feel the same way. In my opinion, if we want to get back to the good old days of more free exploits and root methods, then lets start by donating to our favorite developers in the Android community and leave them some great comments of encouragement! A little lovin’ goes a long way 🙂

Please leave your comment and thoughts. I would love to hear from you.

Tom S. / RootJunky

 

 

*MoFoRoot is a Tool that lets you flash edited rooted system images to your Motorola Droid Turbo and Moto X 2014

*Sun Shine App is an amazing tool that lets you unlock your bootloader on many Motorola and HTC devices along with S-off

Samsung “Next Is Now” S6/Edge

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Samsung Galaxy S6 and Edge

Plastic.

Band-Aid.

Cheap.

Just some words that many have used to describe Samsung’s Galaxy line of phones in the past. This year, Samsung has changed that notion and flipped the tables on its design philosophy.

 

The Samsung Galaxy S6 in the flesh.
The Samsung Galaxy S6 in the flesh.

 

 

The Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 edge are made out of metal and gorilla glass 4, which wraps the front and back sides of the devices, with the metal around the sides where one would hold the phone. Obviously to most, the name isn’t the only difference between Samsung’s flagship variants, but two curved edges come with the S6 edge. Unlike the recent Galaxy Note Edge which was slanted on one side and took away button real-estate, the S6 edge also is only partway skewed, giving the user room on the sides to hold the device comfortably along the metal sides.

It’s not just the outside that changed though; Samsung has opted for their own silicon this time around using an 2.1 Ghz 14nm Exynos Octa-core processor (64 Bit of course). They’ve also become the first smartphone to include DDR4 memory and UFS 2.0 storage. Without getting nitty gritty in the nerd speak here, this means insanely fast storage with speeds never before seen in a smartphone’s flash memory, faster operations, and much improved battery usage overall.

Samsung has stuck with a 16MP shooter, but are now using Optical Image Stabilitzation (OIS) for un-shaking those photos and an F1.9 lens. Again, not getting down and dirty with specs, the low light quality on this should be insane, and the camera a noticeable improvement over the Galaxy S5. The same lens is also on the 5MP front facing wide-angle camera.

Real life battery usage will take time to see. The Galaxy S6 rocks a 2550 mAh battery while the S6 Edge a 2600 mAh, only a trivial  50 mAh difference. The big change this time around, Samsung has built in a competitor to Qualcomm’s Quick Charge technology. They are claiming 4 Hours of battery life in only 10 minutes on the charger, quite a claim to make! Another inclusion is Wireless Charging and not just one, but two technology are inside. What this means for the end user, is any wireless charging station is going to work just fine, and no more worrying about what a “Qi” is.

Some other additions are Samsung Pay, a serious competitor to Apple Pay and Google Wallet. Not only does it support NFC payments, Samsung Pay supports MagStripe Transfer. Any place that accepts sliding a credit card, will accept Samsung Pay. This is amazing news, with many locations blocking NFC payments for nefarious or unknown reasons. The other addition a new fingerprint scanner, now touch based rather than swiping. This is a key part of Samsung Pay, since it encrypts everything with your fingerprint stored locally on your device, never going to some untrustworthy server.

Overall, Samsung has made some serious strides, but as you may have noticed they have discontinued external storage, water resistance, and removable battery support. This may seem like a deal-breaker to some, but with new charging methods and 3 storage options the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge seem like the phone to want, as of today.

 

 

Specs List:

2.1 Ghz Octa-core Exynos Processer (14nm Process).
16MP F1 w/ OIS back facing. 5MP F1 front facing.
3GB DDR4 memory.
UFS 2.0 storage in 32GB/64GB/128GB configurations.
Wireless charging and NFC.
2550 S6/2600 edge mAh battery.
5.1″ 1440p SuperAMOLED display.
Fingerprint scanner (touch based).
Colors: White Pearl, Black Sapphire, Gold Platinum, Blue Topaz.

The Galaxy S6 and S6 edge are planned to launch April 10th, 2015 in 20 countries initially.

US Cell Phone Carrier Unlocking Policies

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US Cell Phone Carrier Unlocking Policies

unlock carrier

Policies: Verizon | AT&T | Sprint | T-Mobile | US Cellular

First what is carrier unlocking and why might I want this for my device? If your device is carrier unlocked then you can put any carriers sim card in your phone and it will work as long as the device you are using supports that carriers network frequencies. On the other hand if your cell phone is carrier locked then it is stuck on whatever carrier you have and will not work on any other network.

Note: Most people confuse bootloader unlocking with carrier unlocking. These are to very different things carrier unlocking has to do with the Network and bootloader unlocking has to do with freedom to flash custom firmware / OS to your device.

Above you will find linked all the policies for these major carriers. Check to see if you meet the requirements and can get your device carrier unlocked for free through there programs. If you aren’t eligible then start Googling carrier unlock and you will find that there are many free and paid for services out there that can accomplish this task of unlocking your phones networks for you. Most cost 25 dollars or less some are even free.

As of today Feb 11th 2015 the FCC and CTIA is forcing all carriers to allow customers to unlock there phones if they meet the requirements listed. So go check out your carriers policy and see if you are eligible.  Now you will be able to bring your device to any carrier and not have to buy a new one if you don’t want to. As a customer you bought the device and you should fully own it and have full control not the OEM or the carrier.

Other Important Links:  FCC device unlocking FAQ | CTIA Consumer Code for Wireless Service

 

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