Oreo: Coming Soon To A Phone Near You?

Share if the site was helpful

Oreo: Coming Soon To A Phone Near You?

It’s been just over 10 months since Android’s newest version (Oreo) began rolling out to devices. Almost a year, so let’s take a second to see how it’s doing. Well…it may be performing really well in terms of quality, but quantity is lacking.

How bad are we talking?

Every month Google releases Android’s distribution numbers showing how many devices are running each version of their operation system, and according to July’s numbers this year Oreo is active on 12.1% of active devices. As a point of reference, that puts Oreo at the 4th place position behind Nougat, Marshmallow, and Lollipop. There’s no denying this is a pretty sluggish speed for rolling things out (but to be fair it’s 0.4% ahead of where Nougat was during it’s growth phase).

So the trends show that new Android versions typically take more than a year to become the most used release, but this begs the question of why? Oreo offers some pretty cool new features such as picture in picture app usage and notification channels. Apart from battery life there aren’t too many reasons user’s would want to avoid upgrading to the newly offered software. But the issue is that it’s not actually offered to all users. There have been rollout calendars following which phones have adopted Oreo since it’s release, and the list of devices has grown slowly up until this month.

It’s Not The User’s Fault

A large part of why device updates are so slow is how fragmented the Android market currently is. Manufacturers often won’t bother with updating older pieces of hardware because it takes time and energy on their part that isn’t being put towards everything new. The end result is user’s being left high and dry. Even some new devices are hesitant to adopt the new software until it’s tried and true. User’s are able to flash their devices and test out other softwares if they so desire, but it’s not exactly mainstream to do so (as cool as it is!)

The bright side is that if you look at things over time they’re starting to ramp up exponentially. 5 months ago Oreo’s adoption rate was hovering around 1% (5 months after it’s release). Things were looking abysmal then even compared to other version’s growth rates, but thanks to a wave of updates this past month things are starting to look back on track.

Statistics Aren’t Perfect

It’s also important to note that the Android Developer dashboard I linked above relies heavily on Google’s Play Store to collect its data. This means that not every device running a version of Android is actually being accounted for in these numbers. The Play Store currently isn’t available in China (A $35 billion/year app market to be missing), and there are a few other factors at play attributing to uncounted devices. All the same it’s clear that Oreo is at about the same speed of rolling out as Nougat was, and we’ll likely see it enter the top 3 within the next few months. I for one am already looking forward to Android P though 🙂

Have you gotten Oreo on your device yet? What are your thoughts on either it’s performance or it’s rollout speed? Let us know in the comments below!

Android M Developer Preview

Share if the site was helpful

Android M Developer Preview

Google has added a bunch of new features to Android M and today we will be covering some of them. I am really excited to get the official Android M release but for now lets check out Android M Developer Preview. If you are looking for the download link to this new firmware you can find it HERE.  Right now Android M is only available on the Nexus 5, Nexus 6, Nexus 9, and Nexus Player. Here is my review Video if you want to skip right to the good stuff 🙂

New Features

1.  New Look and feel of the Home launcher or should i say Google Now Lanucher. The main difference here is the Lock screen with the added Google now microphone button and new wallpaper.

Screenshot_20150605-075309Screenshot_20150605-075417Screenshot_20150605-080644

Also you get a new app drawer that some love and some hate. it scrolls vertically and has your 4 most recent apps on top. Widgets have been organized a little different also. They are vertical just like the app drawer but if a app has multiple widgets you can scroll through them horizontally. I really like this new widget organization.

Screenshot_20150605-075439Screenshot_20150605-075510

2.  Managing Volume and notifications sounds has finally become easier.  When you press your volume up and down buttons you will be greeted with these options. If you press volume down all the way you will be able to set alarms only mode or do not disturb mode which can also be found on your quick toggles.

Screenshot_20150605-075716Screenshot_20150605-075702Screenshot_20150605-085652

Screenshot_20150605-075538Screenshot_20150605-080352

3. App Permissions has bee added to the mix and i really like this feature. With app permissions you have full control over what your apps have access to or not. If you dont want chrome to have access to your camera services then just turn it off in app permissions its that simple. you can look at individual app permissions of you can see every app that can access the camera. Long with app permissions you can app links what it does is links web links to apps that relate to that app so that when you click on a link to Google drive in Chrome browser it will open your Google drive app if installed.

Screenshot_20150605-075813Screenshot_20150605-075831Screenshot_20150605-075836

 

You can also find this cool Memory tool in settings if you are into monitoring ram info.

Screenshot_20150605-080630Screenshot_20150605-075846

 

4. Google On Tap is activated by long pressing the home button on Android M. How Google on tap works is it looks at what is on your screen at the time you press the buttons and basically Google searches that info to bring you more information on it. Long pressing the home button also brings up the Google search bar for voice commands with OK Google if you want to use it. Right now Google On Tap isnt working in Android M developer preview but i am really excited to check it out when Android M is official later this year. Looks like there will be 3 different preview release of Android M before the official release in Q3. Hopefully we will see some of these features working in later previews.

Screenshot_20150605-093413

 

5. Doze is Android M new method of dealing with standby time. Basically Doze recognizes that your device isnt being used and starts shutting down serves that arent needed. Doze will give you 2 to 4 times the battery life in standby mode on Android M. Battery life and improvements like quick charging are huge for android and the mobile user. I hope to see many more big improvements on Battery life in the future.

Android-M-s-New-Doze-Feature-Is-a-Mixed-Bag-482789-2

6. Android Settings theme is a new feature that has to be turned on in developer settings. To turn on developer settings you need to click on your build number in about phone 7 times then you will have developer settings and be able to turn on the dark theme that i love. 🙂 Also you can see that the Android M developer Preview has a Easter egg just like all the other android versions but it is lacking any game like lollipop can with Flappy Android.

Screenshot_20150605-080126Screenshot_20150605-080133Screenshot_20150605-080149

Screenshot_20150605-080201Screenshot_20150605-080304Screenshot_20150605-080257

 

7. Again Google teases us with Android Pay showing of some of its awesome features and ease of use but doesnt include it in Android M. Google Pay is going to be great competition for Apple Pay and other payment methods available today.

 

If you are looking to install Android M on your Nexus device then you may want to check out this video. How to install Android M Developer Preview.

Note I edited all the Nexus Android M Firmware and uploaded it HERE so that the Flash-all.bat file will now work.

Links to Google Announcements on Android M with more great info

Android M Developer Blog

Android M Program overview and release info

Android Factory Reset Protection

Share if the site was helpful

Android Factory Reset Protection

What are the pros and cons of Android factory reset protection? This is a new feature that is included with Android version 5.1.1. First, I have to state that any security measures that can be added to your android device will only improve the safety of your personal data. That being said, you as the owner of the device, should also have the option and control to turn these features on and off as you choose. For example, unlocked bootloaders, carrier unlock, factory reset protection, and Write Protect to name just a few.

Pros

1. Device will not even boot to lock screen without the correct password. Kernel level password check.

2. Using Android device manager, you can remotely locate and/or wipe the data on your device.

3. If your device is lost, stolen, or wiped, only someone with your Google account or screen lock information can use the device.

 

Cons

1. Device protection is automatically turned on when you add a Google account and setup a lock screen password. I list this as a con because it is automatic.

2. If you have Factory Reset Protection turned on and you mess something up, it will not boot or you forgot your password, then you will also not be able to reset it in stock recovery. The only way to fix this is to use a tool like odin, rsd lite, fastboot, or lg flash tool to restore the factory firmware.

3. If you can’t provide your Google account information during the setup process, you won’t be able to use the device at all after factory reset.

 

Sprint put together a great little walk through explaining how to turn on and off Factory Reset Protection. HERE IS THE LINK

Another great read on this subject from Google  HERE

Important: If you reset your Google account password and need to do a factory reset, you need to wait 72 hours after changing your password to reset your device. This is for security purposes.  

 

Loot For Root

Share if the site was helpful

Loot For Root

How do you feel about paying for apps like Sun Shine by Jcase and company or programs like MoFoRoot*? Here are some of my thoughts.

rooted

There are two sides to the discussion about paying for exploits and development on your android devices.  One side is obviously the developers and the other is that of the user or android community member who has been waiting for a awesome new root or unlocked bootloader method to be released.  Since there are two sides, I decided it would only be fair to contact Jcase and ask him in person why he has chosen to create a paid-for tool like Sun Shine app*. Let me start this post with a quick note: I am going to try and stay neutral in this matter until the end of the post where you will see my thoughts on the matter, so lets begin.

Here are some of Jcase’s thoughts and some of the questions I asked him.

Q:  Why make everyone pay for the Sun Shine app instead of just releasing the exploit to the android community and the world?

A:   “There are way more complaints with the free exploits than the paid versions” So I asked him to explain. When he releases free exploits they are normally not in a perfect form and may even be a bit buggy, but they still work. Jcase has no desire to make them work any better since he mainly enjoys finding the exploit, not spending tons of time making them noob friendly. Since it isn’t the easiest exploit in the world to perform on a given device, it turns into a big headache for him to deal with and ain’t nobody got time for that!

Q:  What cost is involved for you to find and create these exploits for the Android community?

A:  To answer this question Jcase gave this example. To fully test Sun Shine app he had to buy 30 Motorola Moto G phones to make sure that Sun Shine would be noob friendly. Along with this major cost, there is the time and research. He invests alot of time into the paid versions of his exploits like Sun Shine. “You get what you pay for.”

Q: Why not fund your research and expenses with donations and bounties?

A: He explained that the last bounty only paid out 30% of what was promised in the bounty thread.  Jcase continued to explain that by selling Sun Shine app, he is crowd funding his research and future development.

A few quick notes from our conversation:

1.  Working on android is for fun and done in our free time.

2.  Family time is important and Android takes a lot of time away from them.

3.  If working on Android exploits isn’t enjoyable, then he doesn’t want to do it.

4.  Jcase and the MoFoRoot Developer don’t owe the Android Community anything. If they don’t want to release Android exploits anymore, they don’t have to.

My Thoughts 

I wish that the Android community as a whole was a lot more understanding and friendly to the developers that do Android in their free time. I think that some of the community has scared off many of the developers with all their complaints and demands. If you like what a developer is doing, then support them with a donation. This will really encourage him or her to continue their work on Android. The Android community can be a really great and helpful place. I have met many of you online and love all the fun we have had together over the years. I really wish that we could go back to just donations and bounties to fund and help the developers like Jcase, but that ship has sailed. Loot for root is the new era we have found ourselves in. I, for one, am happy to pay $25.00 for a root or unlocked bootloader; this is much cheaper than buying a developer edition device.  There is just something about paying vs. donations that just gets under my skin and maybe you feel the same way. In my opinion, if we want to get back to the good old days of more free exploits and root methods, then lets start by donating to our favorite developers in the Android community and leave them some great comments of encouragement! A little lovin’ goes a long way 🙂

Please leave your comment and thoughts. I would love to hear from you.

Tom S. / RootJunky

 

 

*MoFoRoot is a Tool that lets you flash edited rooted system images to your Motorola Droid Turbo and Moto X 2014

*Sun Shine App is an amazing tool that lets you unlock your bootloader on many Motorola and HTC devices along with S-off

Rooting: Advantages, Disadvantages and Myths

Share if the site was helpful

Rooting: Advantages, Disadvantages and Myths

hydroponics-myths-570x321

So you got a new phone and you’re wanting to delve into the world of Android rooting. A lot of questions are probably going through your mind. Should I root it? Should I not root it? What could happen if I do? These are all very logical questions that I’m sure the majority of us have asked ourselves at one point or another. So in this article, we’re going to dive head first into the world of Android root, and hopefully make things a little more clear for you.

 

Some of you may be asking, “Well what does root really mean?”

To root your phone basically means to have administrator rights over the system partition on your phone. It can somewhat be compared to having administrator rights on your Windows PC. Basically this means that you can install, and uninstall whatever you want on your phone. Sounds good right? It is. However, there are a couple valid reasons why your phone does not have this access right out of the box. Supposed you’re new to Android and notice that upon turning your phone on, you instantly have access to every system app and system file that is available on your phone. Woah! Careful though, you have no idea what you can or cannot delete without messing something up. You’re smart though, you can use common sense to get you through this. Next thing you know your phone no longer boots up, it won’t even charge! This is one of the many valid reasons that your phone does not come out of the box with superuser access. Believe it or not, it’s disabled to actually protect you!

So now that we’ve got that out of the way, you’re probably thinking “Well should I or shouldn’t I?” The answer to that question is entirely up to you. So let’s go through the advantages AND the disadvantages of rooting your Android device.

Advantages:

Debloat. Bloatware apps are usually carrier specific apps that come preinstalled on your device. They can be helpful, or they can be a nuisance. Keep the ones you want, get rid of the ones you don’t, permanently. NOTE: permanemtly deleting apps bloatware from your device can some times make ota updates fail.

Install and use those “root required” apps. Such as MyBackup Pro, Root Explorer and many more! These apps can become very useful tools in the rooting world and give you so much more control over your device.

Mods, tweaks and themes. Want to have your clock centered? Well that requires root to be able to install or flash a modified SystemUI.apk.

Custom ROMs. ROMs are basically packages of custom made Android software that you can install on your device to have all the nice little features that custom ROMs come with. Rooting is the first step in being able to flash ROMs.

Control “startup apps.” With root permissions, you can even control what apps start automatically when you turn your device on!

These are just some of the very very many advantages to rooting your Android device. Now let’s take a look at some of the disadvantages. (Yes those actually exist.)

Disadvantages:

You may soft brick, or perma brick your device. “Bricking” has 2 forms basically. Softbrick, which is where your phone either bootloops or won’t boot at all, but you still have access to Recovery and/or Fastboot. “Permabrick” or “hardbrick” is exactly how it sounds. You’re phone is a paperweight. It will not boot, it will not charge, and you have no access to Recovery and/or Fastboot.

You’re opened up to making a lot more mistakes, such as deleting your phone.apk, your Settings.apk. You’d be surprised at how much it actually happens. (However, this is why we have websites such as Rootjunky.com and XDA!)

Ok so now we got those out of the way as well, let’s get into some rooting myths!

Myths:

“Once you root, you will no longer receive OTA updates.” – This is simply not true at all. You will still receive the OTA update on your phone if you’re still on the stock software, and you can still install that OTA update as well. However, you WILL lose root access. This can be a pain if your bootloader is not unlocked. You will have to wait for someone to verify that root access is still possible on the new software version.

“Rooting voids your warranty.” – No. No. No. Rooting absolutely does not void your warranty. The absolute only way that root voids your warranty, is if it can be proven :-), that rooting was the direct cause of your issue. However, this is also a confusing subject. Some carriers don’t really care what you do, and some do. Those that do, will not hesitate to deny you any service or replacements if your phone is rooted. Some do not check at all and do not care. Then again, this also varies between OEMs (Motorola, LG, HTC, Samsung). Some OEMs follow the rule I posted above, and some will not grant you any repairs if your device is rooted. The main reason that some places do not care is because of one simple thing, rooting, can in now way at all, damage your device. All rooting does, is install 1 app (Superuser app of choice) and install 1 file (usually in /system/xbin). That’s it. It can in no way cause your touchscreen to stop working, cause your wifi to stop working, cause you to lose mobile data, none of that. It simply can’t do it, unless YOU mess with something after the fact. Keep in mind what I said before though. This is exactly why we have websites like Rootjunky.com and XDA. If something happens, you have a very good chance of recovering your device.

So there you have it. Some advantages, disadvantages, and even some myths about Android rooting. The choice is always up to you if you root or not. That being said, let me leave you with some tips!

1.) Always always always do your research first! Find out what Android version your device is on, find out if it has been confirmed to be able to be rooted.

2.) Try to stay away from Toolkits and “one-click” methods. I’m not saying that the people that make such methods don’t know what they’re doing. What I’m saying is, if you’re going to get into this world, learn the way it used to be done! Learn your adb commands, learn your fastboot commands! Don’t take Android modding away from it’s roots.

3.) When you find a guide about rooting your device, FOLLOW ALL INSTRUCTIONS TO THE “T!!!” Do not cut corners, do exactly what the guide tells you to do!

4.) Last but not least, always make sure you perform backups before flashing ROMs. Always make sure you have a recovery plan before doing ANYTHING to your phone.

Well hopefully this article helped you learn something, and hopefully it made the decision a little easier on you. The Android community is very amazing community that is just filled with people willing to help others out when they’re in need. We’re a community that you absolutely WILL NOT find anywhere else. On that note, be safe, be smart, read, read some more, and have fun!!

 

BY

Gary H

 

Android 5.1 Launches On Nexus Devices

Share if the site was helpful

Android 5.1 Lollipop Arrives

This week on the Official Android Blog, Android Lollipop 5.1 was announced with some minor, but well deserved modifications to Lollipop 5.0.

Dum_Dums_Lollipops

 

A small list of some of the changes:

  • Voice-Over-LTE (Currently supported on T-Mobile and Verizon)
  • HD Voice (Currently supported on T-Mobile and Verizon)
  • Device Protection (Remote locking similar to iCloud lock on iOS products)
  • Better Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Quick-toggles
  • Support for Multi-SIM devices

Android 5.1 is currently being pushed to Nexus 5, 6, 7, 10. If you want this latest firmware the best place to download it is from HERE

Source from Official Android Blog

A couple things i have noticed with android 5.1 are that it runs much smoother on my Nexus 6. Apps and browser windows load quicker which I really like. It also seems like the encryption on the Nexus 6 kind of slowed down the device but with Android 5.1 it is working normal again even with the encryption.  There are also a lot of little animations that make it a much nicer experience.

NVIDIA SHIELD Android Gaming System

Share if the site was helpful

NVIDIA SHIELD Android Gaming System

459087-shield-controller-remote-credit-nvidia

 

Today we are taking a look at Nvidia’s Version of a Android TV box setup. We have already seen the Nexus Player, Ouya, Fire TV and many others but none of them compare to the Nvidia Shield android TV box.  The processing power and specs on this iteration of Android tv box is really amazing and really aimed at the gamer.  The Nvidia shield box will come with a Tegra X1 processor sporting 256-core maxwell GPU, 3GB of ram and be able to display in 4K ultra HD.  This device will be a Android Gamers dream.

Just like all the other Shield device Nvidia has made you will be able to stream games with Nvidia Grid. What’s more is that NVIDIA has worked with partners to port major game titles to Android, specifically for devices powered by the X1 processor. Games like Crysis 3, Doom 3: BFG Edition, Borderlands 2, Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, The Talos Principle, Metal Gear Solid: Revengeance and Resident Evil 5 among others.

Now the best part off all about this device is the price just $199.99 this includes the Nvidia Shield android tv Box, shield remote, and shield controller. The release date is in may 2015 in the us. I for one cant wait to check this device out.

images

 

Nvidia Shield Android TV Specs

  • NVIDIA Tegra X1 Processor with 256-core Maxwell GPU
  • 3GB RAM
  • 4K Ultra-HD Ready with 4K playback and capture up to 60fps (VP9, H265, H264)
  • Audio Features: 7.1 and 5.1 surround sound pass through over HDMI, High-resolution audio playback up to 24-bit/192kHz over HDMI and USB, High-resolution audio upsample to 24-bit/192hHz over USB
  • 16GB on board storage, MicroSD slot supporting 128GB
  • Wireless: 802.11ac 2×2 MIMO 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth: 4.1/BLE
  • Interfaces: Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI 2.0, Two USB 3.0 (Type A), Micro-USB 2.0
  • IR Receiver (compatible with Logitech Harmony)

Check out Nvidia Shield console official page HERE along with a cool video on it

HTC One M9

Share if the site was helpful

HTC One M9 Plus VR Powered by VALVE

Official-HTC-One-M9-renders-price-and-almost-full-specs-allegedly-leaked

HTC One M9

I am sure many of you have seen or even owned a M7 or M8 and know that it is one premium device made of a nice metal unibody build. The HTC One M9 isnt any different but this time HTC added a two tone look to it that i kind of like. The back still has the silver brushed metal but the edges have a nice looking gold metal shine. I think this just adds to the premium look and feel of the M9. Other big changes to note about the M9 is that HTC finally got rid of there back ultra pixel camera and now has a 20mp back camera which i think will be a very big improvement. For those of you that love the ultra pixels, you are also in luck since HTC just moved that camera to the front. Lets talk speed this bad boy will be rocking a Snapdragon 810 octa core CPU based on the 64-bit architecture. The M9 will also have 3GB of ram giving this new HTC device some real processing power and of course it will still have those amazing boomsound speakers we all love. I cant wait to get my hands on this device. make sure you subscribe to my youtube channel for full coverage of the M9 along with any hacking rooting and modding i will be doing on it.

htc_one_m9_2_render

Here is HTC’s official page for the HTC One M9.

 Basic Specs

  • CPU Speed

    • Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 810, octa core
    • 64-bit, 4 x 2.0GHz + 4 x 1.5GHz
  • Memory1

    • ROM: 32GB / RAM: 3GB
    • Extended memory: microSD™ up to 128 GB
  • Camera

    • Main camera: 20MP with sapphire cover lens, auto-focus, BSI sensor, f/2.2, 27.8mm lens, 4K video recording
    • Front camera: HTC UltraPixel™, BSI sensor, f/2.0, 26.8mm lens, 1080p video recording
  • Display

    5.0 inch, Full HD 1080p

  • Sound

    HTC BoomSound™ with Dolby Audio™

  • Battery3

    • Capacity: 2840 mAh
    • Talk time: Up to 25.4 hours for 2G/ 21.7 hours for 3G
    • Standby time: Up to 391 hours for 2G/ 402hours for 3G

HTC VR powered by VALVE

htc-vive-pr-630

 

Here is a picture of the New HTC VR that is in developement. check out the official site HERE

Samsung “Next Is Now” S6/Edge

Share if the site was helpful

Samsung Galaxy S6 and Edge

Plastic.

Band-Aid.

Cheap.

Just some words that many have used to describe Samsung’s Galaxy line of phones in the past. This year, Samsung has changed that notion and flipped the tables on its design philosophy.

 

The Samsung Galaxy S6 in the flesh.
The Samsung Galaxy S6 in the flesh.

 

 

The Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 edge are made out of metal and gorilla glass 4, which wraps the front and back sides of the devices, with the metal around the sides where one would hold the phone. Obviously to most, the name isn’t the only difference between Samsung’s flagship variants, but two curved edges come with the S6 edge. Unlike the recent Galaxy Note Edge which was slanted on one side and took away button real-estate, the S6 edge also is only partway skewed, giving the user room on the sides to hold the device comfortably along the metal sides.

It’s not just the outside that changed though; Samsung has opted for their own silicon this time around using an 2.1 Ghz 14nm Exynos Octa-core processor (64 Bit of course). They’ve also become the first smartphone to include DDR4 memory and UFS 2.0 storage. Without getting nitty gritty in the nerd speak here, this means insanely fast storage with speeds never before seen in a smartphone’s flash memory, faster operations, and much improved battery usage overall.

Samsung has stuck with a 16MP shooter, but are now using Optical Image Stabilitzation (OIS) for un-shaking those photos and an F1.9 lens. Again, not getting down and dirty with specs, the low light quality on this should be insane, and the camera a noticeable improvement over the Galaxy S5. The same lens is also on the 5MP front facing wide-angle camera.

Real life battery usage will take time to see. The Galaxy S6 rocks a 2550 mAh battery while the S6 Edge a 2600 mAh, only a trivial  50 mAh difference. The big change this time around, Samsung has built in a competitor to Qualcomm’s Quick Charge technology. They are claiming 4 Hours of battery life in only 10 minutes on the charger, quite a claim to make! Another inclusion is Wireless Charging and not just one, but two technology are inside. What this means for the end user, is any wireless charging station is going to work just fine, and no more worrying about what a “Qi” is.

Some other additions are Samsung Pay, a serious competitor to Apple Pay and Google Wallet. Not only does it support NFC payments, Samsung Pay supports MagStripe Transfer. Any place that accepts sliding a credit card, will accept Samsung Pay. This is amazing news, with many locations blocking NFC payments for nefarious or unknown reasons. The other addition a new fingerprint scanner, now touch based rather than swiping. This is a key part of Samsung Pay, since it encrypts everything with your fingerprint stored locally on your device, never going to some untrustworthy server.

Overall, Samsung has made some serious strides, but as you may have noticed they have discontinued external storage, water resistance, and removable battery support. This may seem like a deal-breaker to some, but with new charging methods and 3 storage options the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge seem like the phone to want, as of today.

 

 

Specs List:

2.1 Ghz Octa-core Exynos Processer (14nm Process).
16MP F1 w/ OIS back facing. 5MP F1 front facing.
3GB DDR4 memory.
UFS 2.0 storage in 32GB/64GB/128GB configurations.
Wireless charging and NFC.
2550 S6/2600 edge mAh battery.
5.1″ 1440p SuperAMOLED display.
Fingerprint scanner (touch based).
Colors: White Pearl, Black Sapphire, Gold Platinum, Blue Topaz.

The Galaxy S6 and S6 edge are planned to launch April 10th, 2015 in 20 countries initially.

Xposed Framework Lollipop

Share if the site was helpful

Xposed Framework Lollipop Alpha

nexusae0_ic_launcher_thumb

NOTE: That this is still an alpha version and for Lollipop on ARMv7+ devices only. Please install it only if you’re willing to take the risk of boot loops. Just because it’s working fine and stable for me doesn’t mean it will work for everyone the same way. If this brakes your device you may have to flash the firmware to fix it make sure you know how to do that before installing.

How to Check out ARM Version and see if it is 7 or above

  1. Install Android Terminal Emulator  app on your device and open it
  2. Type the followng: getprop ro.product.cpu.abi  OR getprop ro.product.cpu.abi2
  3. It will return with your Arm Version. see picture below

Screenshot terminal

Downloads: Get all files need HERE
xposed-arm-20150213b.zip: Must be flashed with a custom recovery to install the framework.
XposedInstaller_3.0-alpha1.apk: Must be installed to manage installed modules.

Screenshot_2015-02-15-16-20-11Screenshot_2015-02-15-16-20-16Screenshot_2015-02-15-16-20-22

Known issues:
– It seems to boot loop on Samsung stock ROMs. I have received a file which I can use to analyse this issue, but it might take some time.
Update: There’s a difference in the format of *.oat files on Samsung ROMs. I’m trying to find out more

– If everything is working fine, but the app_process version is not displayed, it’s just a display error that can be ignored (will be fixed later).

– Nexus 6 only works if you set selinux to permissive and soft reboot from within the xposed framework app. you can us this Google Play app to change the selinux to permissive.

XDA XPOSED FRAMEWORK OFFICIAL THREAD