Oreo: Coming Soon To A Phone Near You?

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Oreo: Coming Soon To A Phone Near You?

It’s been just over 10 months since Android’s newest version (Oreo) began rolling out to devices. Almost a year, so let’s take a second to see how it’s doing. Well…it may be performing really well in terms of quality, but quantity is lacking.

How bad are we talking?

Every month Google releases Android’s distribution numbers showing how many devices are running each version of their operation system, and according to July’s numbers this year Oreo is active on 12.1% of active devices. As a point of reference, that puts Oreo at the 4th place position behind Nougat, Marshmallow, and Lollipop. There’s no denying this is a pretty sluggish speed for rolling things out (but to be fair it’s 0.4% ahead of where Nougat was during it’s growth phase).

So the trends show that new Android versions typically take more than a year to become the most used release, but this begs the question of why? Oreo offers some pretty cool new features such as picture in picture app usage and notification channels. Apart from battery life there aren’t too many reasons user’s would want to avoid upgrading to the newly offered software. But the issue is that it’s not actually offered to all users. There have been rollout calendars following which phones have adopted Oreo since it’s release, and the list of devices has grown slowly up until this month.

It’s Not The User’s Fault

A large part of why device updates are so slow is how fragmented the Android market currently is. Manufacturers often won’t bother with updating older pieces of hardware because it takes time and energy on their part that isn’t being put towards everything new. The end result is user’s being left high and dry. Even some new devices are hesitant to adopt the new software until it’s tried and true. User’s are able to flash their devices and test out other softwares if they so desire, but it’s not exactly mainstream to do so (as cool as it is!)

The bright side is that if you look at things over time they’re starting to ramp up exponentially. 5 months ago Oreo’s adoption rate was hovering around 1% (5 months after it’s release). Things were looking abysmal then even compared to other version’s growth rates, but thanks to a wave of updates this past month things are starting to look back on track.

Statistics Aren’t Perfect

It’s also important to note that the Android Developer dashboard I linked above relies heavily on Google’s Play Store to collect its data. This means that not every device running a version of Android is actually being accounted for in these numbers. The Play Store currently isn’t available in China (A $35 billion/year app market to be missing), and there are a few other factors at play attributing to uncounted devices. All the same it’s clear that Oreo is at about the same speed of rolling out as Nougat was, and we’ll likely see it enter the top 3 within the next few months. I for one am already looking forward to Android P though 🙂

Have you gotten Oreo on your device yet? What are your thoughts on either it’s performance or it’s rollout speed? Let us know in the comments below!

Android N Developer Preview

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Android N Developer Preview

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I just got home from work to find out that Google released Android N developer preview!!!! So I quickly wrote up a bunch of script files to make it simple to flash this firmware on your Nexus devices. I gave these scripts 2 options on is a full flash with data wipe and the other is firmware no wipe to keep your data in tacked. Hope you enjoy and check back soon as I will be adding to this post later today with some video footage and some pictures 😉 But for now here are the links to this new Android N firmware, just click on your device below. Another option would be to Sign up for the Android Beta Program to get ota updates to this new developer preview.

NOTE: unlocked bootloader required to flash this firmware. Once unlocked just boot into bootloader mode and click the flash all file you want to use.

NEXUS 5X

Nexus 6   plus remove encryption

Nexus 6P   plus remove encryption

Nexus 9

Nexus Player

Pictures below

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How to install Android N Developer Preview on your Nexus Device

 

RootJunky out

TWRP 3.0.0-0 Released with new features

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TWRP 3.0.0-0 Released

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New features in TWRP 3.0.0-0:

  • Completely new theme – Much more modern and much nicer looking (by z31s1g)
  • True Terminal Emulator – Includes arrow keys, tab and tab completion, etc. (by _that)
  • Language translation – It won’t be perfect and especially some languages that require large font files like Chinese & Japanese won’t be availble on most devices. Also some languages may only be partially translated at this time. Feel free to submit more translations to OmniROM’s Gerrit. (mostly by Dees_Troy)
  • Flashing of sparse images – On select devices you will be able to flash some parts of factory images via the TWRP GUI (by HashBang173)
  • Adopted storage support for select devices – TWRP can now decrypt adopted storage partitions from Marshmallow
  • Reworked graphics to bring us more up to date with AOSP – includes support for adf and drm graphics (by Dees_Troy)
  • SuperSU prompt will no longer display if a Marshmallow ROM is installed
  • Update exfat, exfat fuse, dosfstools (by mdmower)
  • Update AOSP base to 6.0
  • A huge laundry list of other minor fixes and tweaks

WARNING: This is our first release in a long time. We have a lot of new and somewhat aggressive changes in this new release. The changes to the graphics back-end may cause some devices to not boot up properly or have other display-related issues. If you are not in a position to reflash an older build of TWRP, then wait until you are or at least wait until others have tried the new TWRP 3.0.0-0 for your specific device. You don’t want to end up with a non-working recovery and have to wait several hours or days to get to a computer to be able to fix it.

Team Win Recovery Project has been my favorite recovery ever since it was released. Dees_Troy and his team have done one amazing job at keeping up with this custom recovery and i am really thankful to them for all there hard work. If you love TWRP as much as i do please send then a little donation to say thanks 🙂

Donate to TWRP HERE

Going a quick search of the TWRP site it looks like there are already a bunch of official supported device that have builds of TWRP 3.0.0-0 available today and more to come soon i am sure, here are some of them.

Nexus 6P, Nexus 5X, Nexus 9, LG G4, Moto X Pure Edition, Moto G 2015, Galaxy Note 5. Many more are available these are just some of the mosts popular.

Click HERE to see if this new version of TWRP is available for your device.

 

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