Pixel 4 Leaks Become Floodgates

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Pixel 4 Leaks Become Floodgates

Over the past few years leaks of new phones have become a commonplace trend.  It almost has to happen nowadays in order for anticipation to build up.  But the Pixel 4 is shattering this trend.  Almost every other day it seems a new leak is springing up.  Let’s look at some of the recent unveilings:

Videos Galore:

This week we saw an influx of videos revealing details about the new device.  One of these was from the YouTube channel AnhEm TV showing almost 7 minutes of details about what the Pixel 4 looks like.  I’d recommend watching it for yourself, but it covers things pretty well showing that the phone has a square shaped camera module similar to what we saw on the iPhone 11 just 2 days ago.

Another video from the channel Rabbit TV shows off the three colors we’re expected to see soon.  These include black, white, and to mix things up a bright orange.  In addition, it seems that the phone does not wear the traditional Pixel fingerprint scanner.  As to what this means for face id or on screen fingerprinting we can’t say, but I would personally LOVE to see some print scanning available anywhere on the touch screen.

Cameras Sell Phones:

I think it’s safe to say most of us are not professional photographers, yet cameras have become one of the biggest selling points for new phones.  On Tuesday Apple spent a good portion of their iPhone 11 presentation fixated on the camera (in fact it was almost all they talked about), and every time a new Pixel comes out the camera is marketed heavily as a use feature of the phone.  The Pixel line always has top rated cameras so don’t get me wrong I’m excited to see what’s in store, but it seems some people forget there are other things to a phone!

But that rant aside, on Monday this week we got a video of a video showing off some new camera fun.  A recording of a Google ad marketing their phone being made “The Google way” demonstrated that the phone would be useful in low light environments again.  But on top of tis you “Even get the stars”.  The new camera will have an astrophotography mode designed to help take pictures of the night sky.  So whether you’ll actually be utilizing it or not, the camera is sure to be very impressive.

Coming Soon to a Store Near You:

Google isn’t expected to do an official announcement of the Pixel 4 until October, but it feels like we’re pretty much there right now.  As more details of the new device come out we’ll keep things updated here, so be sure to stay tuned!

What are your thoughts on the Pixel 4 and it’s leaks?  Let us know in the comments below.

The Inside Scoop on Internal App Sharing

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The Inside Scoop on Internal App Sharing

 

            Testing your apps is a crucial component in a successful release.  Every time you issue updates to your app you run the risk of introducing bugs that can ruin a user’s experience.  We do what we can with unit and UI tests to check and limit these bugs, but some still manage to slip by (no one’s perfect!). So how can we deal with these bugs before they actually get into the hands of a user?

 

Internal App Sharing:

 

            Whether you’re a solo developer or working for a larger company, Internal App Sharing can help with this.  It essentially allows you to upload a second version of your app onto the Google Play Store.  It’s a private upload though that’s only available to people you share the URL with.  What this does is allow you to keep your production app intact while simultaneously letting a select group of people test the new version.

It’s somewhat similar to the beta feature that has been available for quite some time.  But the key difference here is that the app is private. It’s only available to those friends/family/coworkers that you choose to share it with.  It offers a great way for you to limit your testing to people you know. Very aptly names Internal App Sharing!

 

Some Caveats:

 

            Internal App Sharing was first released to us at Google I/O this year so it’s still very new.  After playing around with it and reading the documentation there are a few things to note.  First off, there is a maximum of 100 users that can download the app using this link. So if you are crazy popular then you won’t be able to let all of your friends test! Realistically this probably isn’t a big deal as 100 testers should be plenty to see major bugs that are introduced, but all the same the limit exists.

 

Another limit that might impose a little more on you is that the app you upload has to have a matching package name.  For most cases this will always match since it’s the same app, but if you have different schemes you’re building your app with (debug vs release) that offer different features you’ll need to make sure nothing is different in those package names. Other than these limits though it’s a fairly straightforward process with a positive experience.

 

I currently use Internal App Sharing and I would recommend that you check it out as well!  It’s a great way to share a build of your app with changes to those closest to you before officially releasing anything to the public.  What are your thoughts on the feature?  Let us know in the comments below.

Android Quits on Q

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Android Quits on Q

Well, Android Q has officially been named.  At least, the next version of Android has been named.  In a shocking turn of events Google has decided to move away from its tradition of naming the OS after desserts.  Instead of any Q-esque dessert, Android 10 has been announced.  After 10 years of dessert names, it’s all numbers from here on.

Android 10:

With Android 10 as the next version, things will simply increment up from here (11 and so on).  I guess it had to come to an end eventually, but I think it’s safe to say most of us expected this to happen closer to Z than Q. The world needs more desserts!

As for whythe naming pattern changed, it’s not just because Q is a hard letter to match with a dessert.  Google’s VP of product management for Android said that it’s because desserts aren’t inclusive enough.  “We have some good names, but in each and every case they leave a part of the world out.”

Android is a global brand, and as such they don’t want to pick desserts that are regional and other people can’t relate to.  At least that’s what they say…I still think no one could come up with the right thing for Q!

Android’s Rebranding:

While the naming convention has changed, don’t worry!  The classic Android robot still exists.  He received an updated logo but it’s nothing too drastic. A few small tweaks for him and some larger changes for the Android word itself.  Now in all black, the logo is supposed to be more readable on small devices.  Changing it to a sleek black will help with that issue.

And of course it wouldn’t be any fun if the images were just introduced and then that was it.  Here’s a fun little video released by Android showing off the new look. The video emphasizes heavily that we’ve been growing together as a community, and that shouldn’t stop anytime soon.  While it’s a little cheesy, I have to agree with the sentiment.  There is a sort of bond between Android users and especially as a developer it’s been really fun to watch it change over the years.  Here’s hoping Android 10 continues that trend!

What are your thoughts on the new naming convention?  How about the logo?  Let us know in the comments below.

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